Logical Reasonings / 7.24.17

A. Pssst … if you didn’t already hear, we’re having a tutoring sale starting a week from today. Blueprint LSAT

B. A Harvard Law Con Law professor threw some shade at his former student and new White House Press Secretary, Anthony “The Mooch” Scaramucci. NY Daily News

C. The Association of American Law Schools decided to move its annual conference from Austin after the state signed into a law a bill regulating bathroom use for transgendered people. Inside Higher Ed

D. Democratic leaders unveiled a new party platform given the fun and inspiring slogan “A Better Deal.” NY Times

E. Microsoft is retired its program beloved by all those without artistic skills or the willingness to learn Photoshop, MS Paint. Vox

Logical Reasonings / 7.21.17

A. The special investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia has expanded to include business transactions between Trump and Russian associates. Bloomberg

B. So Trump is now investigating the investigators, and it looks like we’re getting a lawyer-off. Trump’s team of lawyers is looking into dirt on special council Robert Mueller’s team of attorneys, including possible conflicts of interest. NY Times

C. Oh and Trump is apparently asking – for a “friend,” of course – if the President can pardon the President. That would be a real humdinger of a law school finals questions. Washington Post

D. This is all a lot to handle, so Sean Spicer is resigning as Press Secretary. Washington Post

E. Another Trump-related controversy: Trump, in the crazy NYT interview from this week, mentioned that Japanese first lady Akie Abe doesn’t speak any English. The internet then unearthed a video of her speaking fluent English, leading many to assume she used that as an excuse to avoid speaking to Trump, making her a hero to many Trump critics. But such snubbing would be unfathomable to a Japanese public figure, and she and Trump have hung out a bunch before, and actually she may have funded an “ultra-nationalist kindergarten” (?). Let’s leave this one in the dustbins of history and have a great weekend. LA Times

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Tips for those unlucky souls on the waitlist for an LSAT testing center

Let’s suppose you signed up for the LSAT, but there weren’t any open testing centers, so you were placed on the waitlist. Or let’s suppose that you’re one of those unlucky souls who was removed from the waitlist but placed in a suboptimal testing location on the outer reaches of the 100-mile radius.

Bad news? Yes, but your test center isn’t set in stone – you still have until August 22nd to change it (for the low low price of $100, because LSAC misses no opportunity to part you from your money). If you’d like to change your testing center, here are some tips.

Logical Reasonings / 7.20.17

A. A Pepperdine Law professor created a graph that charts LSAT performance by undergrad major. The best LSAT scores tend to come from STEM majors (who also tend to have lower GPA – not so smart are you, nerds?) with Classics majors putting up a surprisingly strong showing. Robert Anderson

B. U.S. News & World Report has some advice for LSAT test takers who had their accommodations request denied. U.S. News & World Report

C. After nine years in Nevada state prison for armed robbery and kidnapping, the juice is loose on and out on parole. LA Times

D. According to the filers of a federal lawsuit, Customs and Borders agents are systematically intimidating and turning away asylum seekers. Huffington Post

E. The #DriveByDunkChallenge is the new meme popping off with the youths who – we get it – can dunk. Deadspin

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Building Your Law School Application: The Personal Statement

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a post about the first step in the law school application process–collecting letters of recommendation. If you thought that sounded terrible (and believe me, you’re not alone in thinking that), then you’re in for a rude awakening. This post is about a far worse part of the application process–the personal statement. As if writing a personal statement for undergrad wasn’t bad enough, you have to write another, more heavily scrutinized personal statement for your law school applications ( “hello darkness my old friend…”).