Aaron Cohn

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Fight Aspiring Law Student Panic by RSVPing to this Wednesday’s Webinars

Is the law school admission cycle sneaking up on you? Has it recently dawned on you that not only is the September LSAT almost here, but if you want to take the December LSAT you need to get a move on it ASAP? Do you wake up in a sweat from dreams of getting your applications in too late? You may have Aspiring Law Student Panic.

There’s no easy cure for ALSP, but there is an effective treatment. We’re here to help. We have two webinars this Wednesday to help you get started on your path back to sanity, and while you’re at it, they’ll help with your path to law school, too.

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A Grouping Game Overview

If you’re a student in one of Blueprint’s classes, you’ve probably wrapped up grouping games recently. What makes an In and Out game different from the rest? How are stable games different from unstable games? And what was a profiling game again? Let’s recap and talk about distinguishing the different types of grouping games from each other.

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The Number of Law Schools Accepting the GRE Just Doubled (…to Four Law Schools)

In a day, the number of law schools accepting the GRE in lieu of the LSAT doubled. Monday, Georgetown and Northwestern law schools announced that they would begin to accept the GRE. Harvard and Arizona were already there, so that makes four law schools.

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Here we go, yo (again) … Scenarios for grouping games

When you can break an LSAT logic game down into a few possibilities up front, we call that making scenarios. When you do it right, it can make so many games so much easier, but you have to know when to use it. We covered hints that you might want to do scenarios in ordering games a couple weeks ago. Today, let’s talk about when scenarios are a good idea in grouping games.

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Here we go, yo—when should you make a scenario?

Scenarios are one of the most killer strategies for LSAT logic games. They don’t work for every game, but when you can split a game into two, three, or four possibilities upfront it’ll often make the questions just breeze by.

In general, look to do scenarios when there’s something in a game that can only go two to four ways and you think that trying those two to four possibilities would help you figure out other thinks in the game. Some kinds of rules lead to scenarios more often than others, so today we’ll cover rules in ordering games that often make scenarios a good idea. If you see one of the following things in a game, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you should do scenarios. But the thought should at least cross your mind.

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

June LSAT scores came out last week. When scores come out, we LSAT instructors get a chance to look at the test. It’s pretty much like Christmas morning for us, and it comes three times a year. Aren’t we lucky? I woke up early to work through the Logical Reasoning sections this morning, and here’s what I thought of that part of the test. Check this blog for analysis of the other sections in the coming days.


Conditional Statements Made Easy: Unlock Sufficiency and Necessity with These Four Words

If you’ve just started studying for the September LSAT, you’re probably learning about conditional statements right now. In two posts this week, we’re going to simplify the process of learning how to diagram these occasionally daunting statements. Today we’re going over how recognize sufficient and necessary conditions.