Alex Connolly

Alex grew up in NYC and studied philosophy and literature at Stanford. He subscribes to several esteemed publications like the New York Times and the New Yorker, but he usually just skips to the movie sections. He loves to write about movies and TV, especially of the courtroom drama variety.

As a teacher, he’s been all over the map, from Los Angeles, to Pasadena, to Hollywood. He’s also taught in Colombia (country not school) and Ethiopia, whose government deported Alex in 2009 when they (erroneously) suspected him of trying to start a revolution.

Author Archive:

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Is the GRE the better law school gatekeeper?

The LSAT is a great, unholy gatekeeper. All ye unhappy law school applicants must stand before its judgment seat. Now, one school wants to open up an alternate, friendlier, less logic games-y route to the legal profession: the GRE.

Wake Forest University School of Law is considering letting some of its incoming students take the Graduate Records Examination (aka the GRE) instead of the LSAT.

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Flawesome!

Flaw Questions are the most common single question type on the LSAT. They also happen to be my favorite question type. I love pointing out people’s flaws, but people don’t always appreciate it. Like this one time, a guy at my house was about to say “glad,” but then changed it to “nice,” and it came out “glice.” I tried to point out the error, but somehow I was the bad guy?

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To Retake or Not?

December LSAT scores are out, and that means many students are now facing a tough choice: retake the test or stick with the score you got?

The question is a perennial one, and one that we’ve tackled before here at Most Strongly Supported. According to data from LSAC, most mid-range test takers (those who scored in the 140s and 150s on their previous LSAT) increase their scores by slightly more than two points when they retake it.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

When you finish a 3.5 hour-long practice test, the last thing you want to do after scoring it is to go over the questions you got wrong. But reviewing practice tests is ridiculously important. It’s as valuable as taking the practice tests in the first place, if you go about it strategically.

First of all, don’t review your test right after you score it. You’re tired and frustrated – at least in my personal experience. I recommend reviewing each test the next day.

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To LSAT, or not to LSAT. That is the question.

If you’ve been studying for the December LSAT, you are hopefully feeling ready and steady for Saturday’s test. But some of you are probably feeling less prepared than you’d like to be. What are your options? Should you hold off until February? Should you plan on taking the test in December and in February? Should you apply to law school this year as planned, or wait until Fall 2016?

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Speed up!

There is a lot to learn for the LSAT, from diagramming conditionals, to memorizing flaw categories, to wrangling with combo games. The December LSAT is fast approaching, and hopefully students taking the test next month will be familiar with most of the material at this point.

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What Would ‘Always Sunny’ Characters Get on the LSAT?

For this installment, let’s talk about It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, the beloved and depraved FX sitcom following a rag-tag group of ignorant, self-absorbed, morally bankrupt bar owners in the City of Brotherly Love.

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Why Taking the LSAT a Second Time Can Be a Good Thing

Taking the LSAT twice is not always the original game plan. But it’s not a bad thing, necessarily. It’s all about how you look at it (that’s the secret). In fact, there are some advantages to taking the test twice.

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One More Week to Study

As you approach a black hole, the world starts looking faster, bluer, and hotter. Time is dilating and gravity is drawing you into the darkness. As they’re closest to the singularity, tidal forces pull most strongly on your feet, so your body “spaghettifies.” It elongates until it snaps in two. You hurdle toward the inevitable, sight unseen, into oblivion. Approaching the LSAT can feel similar.