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Battle LSAT Anxiety with Your Brain (and Butt)

Test anxiety is real, and the LSAT brings about an entire cornucopia of emotions. It’s understandable; you’ve spent months preparing for this test that will determine where you spend the next few years of year life and possibly even who will hire you after graduation. Plus, you really don’t want to retake the LSAT and go through that endeavor all over again (but you might have to).  Walking into your test room as prepared as possible is one way to deal with LSAT test anxiety, but there are other techniques to keep you cool, calm, and collected before, during, and after the LSAT.

For today’s post we brought in recently licensed marriage and family therapist Megan Riley to share her thoughts on controlling test day anxiety.

BPPalex-lsat-blog-when-start-studying
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Finding the Tools to Succeed When Studying with ADHD

Half the battle of studying for the LSAT can be about finding a study strategy that works for you. I have the “inattentive” subtype of ADHD, which generally manifests as limited attention, distractibility, forgetfulness, and procrastination. If these sound like obstacles to success on the LSAT, you’d be right. But the LSAT holds significance in my life for a different reason. I believe the LSAT was the first time that I found study and test performance strategies that truly allowed me to achieve my full academic potential.

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Countdown… One Week Until the LSAT

You’ve drilled each section of LSAT for months until you’re thinking in Logic Games and dreaming in Reading Comprehension passages. (Eek!) The good news is your dedication and type-A work ethic will pay off on Saturday when you finally take the LSAT. But in these last six or seven days stay the course — don’t neglect your studies, and don’t burn out cramming either. Follow these last minute LSAT tips to finish strong:

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Minimizing Your LSAT Anxiety, Explained Through Four Scenarios

Anxiety affects virtually every LSAT student in one way or another. After all, it’s a test that could impact your entire career. The good news is that you can prepare yourself to handle some of the most stressful situations students deal with on the LSAT and learn how to minimize that anxiety on exam day. Let’s look at some of the most high pressure LSAT scenarios students face, so you’ll be ready for them on your exam.

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BPPivey-lsat-blog-law-school-dismissal
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I’ve been academically dismissed following 1L. What should I do?

In this post, law school admissions expert Anna Ivey answers a student’s question about reapplying to law school following an academic dismissal.

Student: “I completed one year of law school in May 2017. However, I was academically dismissed due to poor test results. Currently, I am taking a year off from law school, but I am determined to complete law school and become an attorney. I am strongly considering retaking the LSAT before reapplying.”

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From The Vaults: Should You Write a Diversity Statement for Law School?

Good law schools want a rich learning environment for their students. A rich learning environment involves the inclusion of different perspectives, backgrounds, experiences, and philosophies contributing to the dialogue, debate, and discussion in each class. Good law schools recognize that having a diverse student body is a benefit to all law students (and to law professors as well). The diversity statement is one way to see if an applicant would contribute to a diverse 1L class, because the application form may not give the law school admissions committee enough information about the applicant’s background and diversity factors.

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Hindsight Is 20/20: Reviewing My Own Personal Statement

Today we’re bringing back a classic post from the vault. This post was originally published on October 18, 2011 – and, much like a fine wine, has only improved with age. Matt Shinners is a Harvard Law graduate who taught and provided application counseling for Blueprint LSAT Prep. His application clearly turned out *okay*, but nevertheless, we can all learn from his successes (and failures, such as they are).

I applied to law school in October/November of 2006 with a 3.7/180 and the following law school personal statement. It was not even close to the strongest element of my application package.

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In Law School Admissions, Timing Isn’t Everything

Ah, October. The smell of leaves, the taste of Halloween candy, and the panic of law school hopefuls rushing to get their applications in.

But beware, early birds; you won’t always get the worm just for showing up first. While many law schools have rolling admissions, it is far better to submit an application that is well thought-out and includes an LSAT score that you are proud of than hurrying to get in an app that your friends reassured you was “fine.” Think hard about whether you did your best, or maybe if taking the December LSAT or spending an extra couple weeks rewriting your personal statement would really make your application shine. If you do decide to take the LSAT again in December, make sure you have all of the other parts of your application ready to be sent the minute that score comes back.