Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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The flawless LSAT taker knows her flaws.

Flaw questions on the LSAT are many things, but unpredictable they ain’t – LSAC loves to use variations on the same flaw, over and over. (That’s one of the reasons why the LSAT is such a learnable test.) Obviously, in order to effectively tackle Flaw questions on the LSAT, you should have a good understanding of the flaws themselves. However, it’s also very helpful to know things that are very rarely flaws – things that show up frequently as an answer choice, but are almost never the correct answer.


The Perfect LSAT Snack

LSAT test day is almost upon us, and it’s time to turn your thoughts to the single most important part of the LSAT, something you’ve been practicing for your whole life. That’s right – it’s finally time to discuss the snack.
For all that LSAC gives exhaustive guidelines about what can and cannot be in your gallon-sized Ziploc bag (Erasers? Sure! Erasers with sleeves? No way!), they don’t have much to say on the subject of your mid-test snack. Your beverage has to be in a plastic container or juice box and can’t be bigger than 20 ounces (so kiss that can of Red Bull goodbye), but that’s about all the guidance you get.

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Oh crap. It’s September. I’m not ready.

Maybe you’ve been prepping for the September LSAT but your practice test scores are well below where you’d like them to be. Maybe you intended to take the September test, but time got away from you, and suddenly the registration deadline was long gone. Maybe you were planning on taking the December LSAT all along. Either way, fear not – taking the December LSAT is not the disadvantage many 0Ls seem to think it is.

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The LSAT is all about analyzing arguments. Here are some shortcuts.

The folks at LSAC are very good at making a tricky test that (in combination with college GPA) correlates to some degree with first-year law school grades. But creative, they ain’t. As you continue studying for the LSAT, you’ll notice that the test uses the same argument structures over and over.

This is good news for you, the studious test-taker.

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Slow down there, LSAT student!

At the beginning of Blueprint LSAT Prep’s courses, many students are understandably more than a little anxious about timing. There are a whole lot of questions on that sucker; how will they ever be able to get through them all?! And, to be honest, that anxiety will likely continue for a large portion of the course. That said, it’s a bad idea to stress about how quickly you’re getting through questions during the first half (or so) of your course, and here’s why.


International Law: Brexit and You

America is obviously the greatest country in the world, but with all that Brexit stuff in the news recently, you may have had reason to take a break from all that hamburger-eating and eagle-wresting to find out what’s going on in the rest of the world. If all of those goings-on have piqued your interest in international law, it’s your lucky day, because we’re going to delve into the details.

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The Ins and Outs of LSAT Score Release

As if taking the LSAT isn’t stressful enough, LSAC has apparently endeavored to make the process of releasing LSAT scores as anxiety-producing and uncertain as possible. It’s as if the evil geniuses at LSAC realize they only have one more chance to toy with your emotions, and are taking full advantage of the opportunity. Here’s a run-down of what to expect (and not to expect) when you’re expecting an LSAT score.

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Here we go, yo. What’s the scenario(s)?

Scenarios are the dragons of the LSAT prep world: Often discussed in harsh whispers, but hard to find unless you know where to look. However, they’re also a powerful tool that can help you achieve your goal with a little strategizing (and a hint of brute force). The below guide will help you demystify scenarios faster than you can say “Daenerys Stormborn, of House Targaryen, Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, Breaker of Chains, and Mother of Dragons.”