Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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The Amazing Journey (From BP Student To Instructor)

Last week, I pulled back the curtain on the glamorous life of an LSAT instructor. I became an LSAT sensei after taking a course with Blueprint LSAT Prep, and as a result, I’ve experienced life on both sides of the podium – from both the instructor’s and the student’s viewpoint.

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The Inside Scoop: The Life of a Blueprint Instructor

I’m going to go out on a limb and assume that if you’re reading this blog, you know what it’s like to study for the LSAT. But have you ever wondering what an LSAT class is like from the other side of the podium? You’re in luck, because I’m here to spill the juicy* and shocking* details about what it’s really like to be an LSAT instructor.

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The February LSAT, Weird Runt of the Litter

There’s about a week left to register for the February LSAT. We at Most Strongly Supported have written before about some things to consider when deciding whether to take the February administration of everyone’s favorite test. Of course, the biggest factor to take into account is that the February LSAT is undisclosed, meaning LSAC doesn’t release the test afterwards.

The reason the February LSAT is nondisclosed is that in order to release the test afterwards, LSAC’s employees must journey to a remote island in the middle of the Abysmal Ocean.

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You Got This!

Well, this is it. After months of preparation, the day of reckoning – the December LSAT test day – is here.

Do you feel ready? No? That’s fine – in fact, that’s normal. No matter how long you’ve been studying, there will always be something else that you could’ve studied if you had just a little more time. But even if you don’t feel ready, you are.

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The December LSAT is upon us.

If you’re registered for the December LSAT, I’m sure I don’t need to remind you that test day is fast approaching. By this point, you should be about done learning new material and shifting fully into practice mode. We’ve discussed how to spend your time during these critical final weeks, but here are some pointers to keep in mind for your mental health:

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Sufficient and Necessary Assumption Questions, Demystified

Halloween may be over, but spookiness still lurks around the corner for LSAT-studiers who are just getting to sufficient and necessary assumption questions. These question types are tricky, and also appear frequently in the Logical Reasoning section, so it’s important to have a firm handle on what each type of assumption means. If all you know is that these question types are sufficient to give you a headache, read on!

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My 99th Percentile LSAT Score Story: Laura Santoski

I’m basically a dinosaur in LSAT years, since I took the test way back in October 2011, when I had to walk uphill both ways barefoot in the snow to get to my testing center. Through a combination of smart preparation and good luck, I scored a 178 that day (woo hoo!), and today I’d like to share my story with you young whippersnappers, along with some tips to help you replicate my success.

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The flawless LSAT taker knows her flaws.

Flaw questions on the LSAT are many things, but unpredictable they ain’t – LSAC loves to use variations on the same flaw, over and over. (That’s one of the reasons why the LSAT is such a learnable test.) Obviously, in order to effectively tackle Flaw questions on the LSAT, you should have a good understanding of the flaws themselves. However, it’s also very helpful to know things that are very rarely flaws – things that show up frequently as an answer choice, but are almost never the correct answer.