Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Tips for those unlucky souls on the waitlist for an LSAT testing center

Let’s suppose you signed up for the LSAT, but there weren’t any open testing centers, so you were placed on the waitlist. Or let’s suppose that you’re one of those unlucky souls who was removed from the waitlist but placed in a suboptimal testing location on the outer reaches of the 100-mile radius.

Bad news? Yes, but your test center isn’t set in stone – you still have until August 22nd to change it (for the low low price of $100, because LSAC misses no opportunity to part you from your money). If you’d like to change your testing center, here are some tips.

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logic Games

Today we’re wrapping up our analysis of the June 2017 LSAT with an in-depth look at the Logic Games section. Unlike the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comp sections, early reports indicated was relatively gentle on battle-weary test-takers. Were those reports correct? Read on to find out!

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Don’t Get Hung Up on Your Practice Exam Scores

Keeping your eyes on the prize is great—to a point. But when you’re studying for the LSAT, it’s easy to be too focused on the gap between your practice test scores and your goal score. Your end goal is important, but getting there is a gradual process, and stressing too much about how far you have to go isn’t helping you.

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Conditional Statements Made Easy: Dealing with Hidden Conditional Statements

Earlier this week, we gave you a quick run-down on the basics of sufficiency and necessity. Today, I have some good news and bad news for you. The bad news is that LSAC sometimes attempts to disguise conditional statements with more confusing language. The good news is that, once you learn how to interpret that language, the conditionals still work in exactly the same way.

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Counterpoint: The New LSAT Schedule Is Trash

Yesterday, we talked about all the great benefits resulting from LSAC’s recent decision to offer two additional test dates per year. Today, I’m here to poop on everyone’s party. Here’s why you shouldn’t get too excited about having six chances to take the LSAT every year (aside from the obvious fact that no one gets too excited about taking the LSAT):

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The Last Push: Reading Comprehension

The clock is ticking on the final countdown to the June LSAT, and the pressure is on. If you already feel 100% prepared and like there is no room for improvement, then this post is not for you. But if you wouldn’t mind improving by a point or two, then read on.

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Last Chance to Register for Today’s Two Webinars!

There’s a lot of information on the ol’ World Wide Web about the LSAT and law school admissions, but it can be hard to figure out where to look or which sources are trustworthy. That’s where we come in.

Today, Wednesday, May 31, we’re providing two free webinars to guide you through your pre-law journey: an LSAT webinar and a law school admissions webinar.

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Unlocking Logic Games with Organization

The more I work with LSAT students, the more I believe that the way you organize your work on the Logic Games affects your overall performance. I’ve seen a lot of students who are struggling to understand games or find deductions, and often when I look at their homework, it’s hard to even figure out what they’re doing because their work is all over the place and totally disorganized.

This is, of course, bad. Despite what you may think, the way that you organize your work for Logic Games makes a big difference on your performance, and the best practice is not to use up as much of the white space on the page as you can. Instead, your work should be kept to a limited, but well-organized, area. This is for two reasons: 1) speed, and 2) ease of finding deductions.

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Speeding Up on Those Pesky Reading Comp Passages

As the June LSAT approaches, you may be turning your attention to that pesky Reading Comprehension section, the bane of many students who feel that it’s just impossible to get through all four of those passages in a measly 35 minutes. If you relate to that description, you might also be wondering what in the world you can do to improve your score, because you’re already reading the passages as fast as you can.