Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Practice Exam 2: A “Choose your own adventure” story

You’ve been hard at work studying for the LSAT over the last couple months, and the moment of truth has arrived–it’s time to take your second practice test. You set aside some time on the weekend for a grueling five sections, consoled only by the thought of the shining “180” that is sure to light up the screen when you score the test. The moment of truth has arrived, and you check your answers, only to see–what’s this?? Can this be true? Your second practice test score is not, in fact, dozens of points higher, but within a point or two of your first test (or maybe even slightly lower)!!!

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Don’t Forget … Today’s the Regular Registration Deadline for the September LSAT

It’s August, illustrating once again that time continues its inexorable march. Soon the leaves will wither and die on the branch, carpeting the earth until they are hidden by a soft layer of snow. Every day, we grow older, inching incrementally closer to the grave.

Oh yeah, it also means that today is the regular registration deadline for the September LSAT.

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Stuck on Reading Comp? Focus on the author’s attitude

Reading Comprehension is the bane of many an LSAT student’s existence, but contrary to what you might believe, it is possible to improve your score on that most vilified of sections. In general, in order to improve your score you should focus on tackling the passages more strategically – you’re unlikely to suddenly start reading much faster, so instead you need to be more efficient when it comes to both the passage and the questions.

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Tips for those unlucky souls on the waitlist for an LSAT testing center

Let’s suppose you signed up for the LSAT, but there weren’t any open testing centers, so you were placed on the waitlist. Or let’s suppose that you’re one of those unlucky souls who was removed from the waitlist but placed in a suboptimal testing location on the outer reaches of the 100-mile radius.

Bad news? Yes, but your test center isn’t set in stone – you still have until August 22nd to change it (for the low low price of $100, because LSAC misses no opportunity to part you from your money). If you’d like to change your testing center, here are some tips.

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logic Games

Today we’re wrapping up our analysis of the June 2017 LSAT with an in-depth look at the Logic Games section. Unlike the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comp sections, early reports indicated was relatively gentle on battle-weary test-takers. Were those reports correct? Read on to find out!

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Don’t Get Hung Up on Your Practice Exam Scores

Keeping your eyes on the prize is great—to a point. But when you’re studying for the LSAT, it’s easy to be too focused on the gap between your practice test scores and your goal score. Your end goal is important, but getting there is a gradual process, and stressing too much about how far you have to go isn’t helping you.

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Conditional Statements Made Easy: Dealing with Hidden Conditional Statements

Earlier this week, we gave you a quick run-down on the basics of sufficiency and necessity. Today, I have some good news and bad news for you. The bad news is that LSAC sometimes attempts to disguise conditional statements with more confusing language. The good news is that, once you learn how to interpret that language, the conditionals still work in exactly the same way.

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Counterpoint: The New LSAT Schedule Is Trash

Yesterday, we talked about all the great benefits resulting from LSAC’s recent decision to offer two additional test dates per year. Today, I’m here to poop on everyone’s party. Here’s why you shouldn’t get too excited about having six chances to take the LSAT every year (aside from the obvious fact that no one gets too excited about taking the LSAT):

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The Last Push: Reading Comprehension

The clock is ticking on the final countdown to the June LSAT, and the pressure is on. If you already feel 100% prepared and like there is no room for improvement, then this post is not for you. But if you wouldn’t mind improving by a point or two, then read on.