Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Understanding Your LSAT Score: The “Curve,” Explained

In a surprise move, LSAT scores were released late last night (so much for day-old promises, LSAC), which means a bunch of LSAT students have a shiny new LSAT score. You’ll hopefully hear lots of score recipients gushing about their scores, and you’ll probably hear some folks who are bummed out as well (we’ll have a post for those guys in the next couple days).

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Heads Up! We’ll Be Hosting Two More Webinars on Thursday, March 15th!

Top o’ the morning to you! It’s finally March, the month of unseasonably late snowstorms (at least for those of us in the Northeast), busted brackets, and drunks stumbling around the city wearing green on St. Paddy’s Day. It’s also the time of year when a crop of new students begins to think somewhat abstractly about the LSAT looming in their future, or perhaps the law school applications they’ll have to submit in the upcoming fall.

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Should you take the June or July LSAT?

As previously announced, LSAC is finally falling more in line with other graduate school exams and is adding additional test dates — instead of only being given four opportunities per year to take the LSAT, future test-takers will have up to six chances per year. This year, test-takers in North America have the option to take the test on June 11 — as was the case in previous years — or on July 23, which will be the first time the test has been offered in July.

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Your Schedule for the Last Week before the February LSAT

It’s the week of the February LSAT, and if you’re taking the test this week, you might be wondering about how best to spend your final few days. Luckily, we’ve got your back. Here’s the rundown on what the rest of your week should look like in order to ensure maximum preparedness this weekend.

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Mastering the Final Stage of Your LSAT Studies

You’ve spent months slaving over Flaw and Sufficient Assumption questions. You’re having dreams about diagramming and taking the contrapositive of conditional statements. You’ve pilgrimaged to the top of the tallest mountain and communed with the wise man to find out when to use scenarios in Logic Games. Now you’re in the home stretch of your studying, and you’re wondering how to proceed.

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RSVP to the Webinars We’re Hosting Next Wednesday!

Everyone says “New Year, New Me,” but we don’t hear too many people saying “New Year, New LSAT Score.” Frankly, we’re mystified by why more people aren’t thinking about the LSAT at the moment the clock strikes 12:01 am on New Year’s Eve, and every moment thereafter. Who can explain this phenomenon? No one. No one at all, so don’t even try.

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Stabilizing Unstable Grouping Games

Recent administrations of the LSAT have seen an uptick in a certain type of Logic Game that we at Blueprint like to call unstable grouping games. If that phrase seems like a string of gibberish to you, here’s an example of the type of game we’re referring to: