Philip Mayer

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20% Off Tutoring Ends Tonight!

Great news, everybody! Our sale on all Blueprint tutoring packages is still going on. But unfortunately, all good things must come to an end, and this particular sale is going to end tonight at 6:30 pm PT. Until then, you can get 20% off of both our tutoring packages and hourly tutoring by entering the promo code SUMMER20 at check-out.

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What caused the yuge increase in LSAT-takers this June?

According to LSAC, the number of LSAT takers was up 20% from June of last year. In the four or five years since I became more attentive to LSAT trends, I can’t remember very many jumps as significant as this one. This post is going to discuss a few factors that may have played into the increase in test-takers.

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Building Your Law School Application: The Personal Statement

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a post about the first step in the law school application process–collecting letters of recommendation. If you thought that sounded terrible (and believe me, you’re not alone in thinking that), then you’re in for a rude awakening. This post is about a far worse part of the application process–the personal statement. As if writing a personal statement for undergrad wasn’t bad enough, you have to write another, more heavily scrutinized personal statement for your law school applications ( “hello darkness my old friend…”).

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Last Chance to Sign Up for Summer Classes!

I hope by now you’ve recovered from your Fourth of July hangover—if not, I’m not even mad, that’s amazing. I’m sure the first thing on your mind now that summer is in full swing is law school! After all, what could be a better way of winding away the long days and short nights than dreaming about your future career as a lawyer. Nothing, right?

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What to do the summer before 1L?

For those who are done with the LSAT and have gotten into law school, congratulations! At this point, you’re probably starting to think about how you should spend the summer before 1L, the dreaded first year of law school, begins. I had the same question three years ago. I talked to a lot of law students and lawyers about it, and I’m going to share their insights and my thoughts here.

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Building Your Law School Application: Letters of Recommendation

For those of you who are happy with how the June LSAT went, it is time to start thinking about getting your application materials together. If you’re thinking, “Wow, I just got done studying and taking a stressful exam, the last thing I want to do is start jumping through a bunch of application hoops,” well…this is just the beginning. Strap in for three years of academic hoop-jumping, culminating in a much worse examination (excuse my negativity, bar studying is taking its toll on me).

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Point: The New LSAT Schedule Is Pretty Good, For the Most Part

Last week, LSAC announced the LSAT is switching to a 6-test-a-year schedule. That means, in 2018, there will be an exam in June, September, and November and, in 2019, the exam will be administered in January, March, and early June. Now, my personal feelings aside, I’m going to talk about the potential benefits of this scheme.

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SCOTUS and the Travel Ban

Almost four months ago to the day, President Trump sent out the following tweet: “SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!” The emphatic message came on the heels of a Ninth Circuit decision refusing to enforce the first travel ban on individuals form seven enumerated countries. Though the President’s promise did not immediately come true—instead, the administration rolled out a second, updated travel ban—it appears that the next stop will indeed by the Supreme Court.