Philip Mayer

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BPPlaura-lsat-blog-appellate-law
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The 9th Circuit and the Immigration Ban

Last week, the Ninth Circuit upheld the lower court’s temporary restraining order on the Trump administration’s travel ban. If you listen to some news outlets, you’ve probably heard this described as an activist decision by politically motivated judges. To those on the other side of the issue, this was a much needed check by the judiciary on a rogue executive. But for all the opinions being bandied about, it is important to understand what the Ninth Circuit’s decision actually did — and didn’t — do.

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From the Vaults: Maintaining Mental Health At Law School

February 1 of a student’s first year is, statistically, the most depressing day in law school. With that backdrop in mind, I, as a first year student in the midst of the (objectively) unhappiest period of law school, have some thoughts.

BPPyuko-lsat-blog-public-interest
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A Primer on Disability Law

A student at University of Oregon Law School has sued the school for failing to accommodate his disability. In related news, Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos seemed unaware in her confirmation hearing what federal disability requirements were for disabled students (although the context was primary school). Now seems like a good time to discuss the basics of disability law, primarily focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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What on Earth is an emolument?

Two and a half years into law school, I am still woefully ignorant of the U.S. Constitution. For example, I only recently found out about the Emoluments Clause. Article I, Section 9, Clause 8 of the Constitution says, “No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.” (In case you’re wondering, an emolument is generally defined as compensation for services or from employment or an office). Basically, the Clause is meant to prevent political office-holders from accepting gifts so that they aren’t improperly influenced by outside entities.

BPPphilip-lsat-blog-immigration-law
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Amazon Echo and the Fourth Amendment

Our generation is used to giving up control over vast amounts of personal information. From Facebook check-ins to cell site location information, the police have readily ascertainable digital footprints to track virtually all of our movements. The question, which the Supreme Court will likely have to address going forward, is how much digital information can be presented in court without violating either the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable searches.

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The Cautionary Tale of Charlotte Law School

Rumors of the demise of Charlotte Law School have not been grossly exaggerated. The school has been derided, sued, and, now, cut off from federal financial aid. Well, in reality, I should say the students are the ones who have been cut off from federal aid. Some might say that the government’s action needlessly targets the students, rather than the school, but I do not share that opinion. I, for one, am glad the government recognized the school’s failure to adhere to minimum standards for aid, and perhaps finally this will shutter a school that’s closure has been a long time coming.

BPPlaura-lsat-blog-summer-job-ideas-boost-your-law-school-applications
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What makes a “good” law school? And what makes a “good” job?

When I applied to law school, I was mostly concerned with one thing: getting a job. As a peripheral goal, I also wanted to get a job in California. But my main focus was on making sure that I would gain an offer of employment from a large law firm paying the market rate in a major industry. I knew I would be taking on debt to attend law school, and I wanted to be able to repay it quickly.

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The Perfect Snack for The December 2016 LSAT

We all know the most important part of the LSAT is your test day snack. It almost goes without saying. This post is going to cover the best, and worst, snack day options. Believe me, not all snacks are created equal — this is serious business.

First, let’s talk about some snacks that you should definitely not bring to the LSAT. I would recommend against bringing Red Bull, Five Hour Energy, or any other energy drink unless you are very used to taking practice tests with the jolt of liquid courage such beverages provide.

BPPlaura-lsat-blog-practice-exam-two
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Law Schools Are Interested In Whether You Pass The Bar

Last year, bar exam passage-rates fell to a near all-time low, leading some to question whether bar exam administration is a problem or whether schools are failing to do enough to prepare their students. Both states and schools are trying to respond to the issue by making changes. For example, New York just opted to

BPPalex-lsat-blog-law-school-discussion
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The People You Meet In Law School

Law school is a lot like high-school. There are lockers, people carry backpacks, and everyone knows about everyone else’s business. We all know that high-school has certain defined social groups (see “The Breakfast Club”). This post is going to discuss the types of people that you meet at law school, both good and bad.

Now, we all know the classic variety of law students — the “gunners.” These are the students who stay late after class to talk to the professor, raise their hand for every volunteer question (and, evil of all evils, ask questions in the last two minutes), and brag about spending every waking moment in the library studying.