Robert Seaney

Robert Seaney is a second-year student at Harvard Law School, which is unfortunate after having grown accustomed to life in San Fracisco and New York in the years prior. After swearing he'd never get a grasp on Logic Games ("too many moving pieces, dammit!"), he's since developed a solid working relationship with the test's Xinjins and Tyrones and Mauve Dinosaurs.

Robert's writing for Blueprint is inspired by Delillo and DFW. That probably puts it too charitably though -- Robert enjoys reading these authors; his work maybe more channels Bill Watterson's, sans the artistic talents. He enjoys The Economist's gentle snobbery too, with his afternoon tea and crumpets. A brief and traumatic perusal of the Comments section, which unearthed a most pernicious variety of LSAT-engrossed Internet trolls, left Robert preferring the most anodyne of blogging subjects: happy to review the converse fallacy for you, thank you very much. Recently, however, our intrepid corespondent has also tentatively forayed into some more controversial themes, such as whether or not to write out scenarios on a game with four or more possible setups. He looks forward to many more.

Author Archive:

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To Retake the LSAT or Not Retake the LSAT?

With October LSAT scores out this week, I’m sure many of you are either kicking back with a well-deserved beer or else grinding away wrapping up your applications. Here, however, I’d like to address those among us with a less than happy outcome

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A Breakdown of Sports Law

Having hashed out the intricacies of furry and cuddly animal law last week, we turn in the second installment of our practice-area series to sports law — the pragmatic option for all the nerdy types hoping to salvage a distant cousin of their childhood pro athlete aspirations.

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Celebrities Who Don’t Have a Law Degree (But Should)

Any idea what the brilliant Natalie Portman would be like as a lawyer? Perhaps Emma Watson? Maybe David Duchovny? With their degrees from some of the most prestigious universities (*cough * Harvard, Brown, and Yale *cough*) there’s no doubt they could all double as impressive legal professionals.

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What Majors Are Best for Law School?

Undergrads with dreams of eventually attending law school often wonder if there are certain majors that will better prepare you for law school (or that will make your application look better). I’ll go ahead and end the suspense now: There’s definitely no mandatory major if you plan to head to law school. With that said, you can definitely do some thinking and maneuvering to put you in the best position when it comes time for applications. Here’s some general tips and advice for when you’re deciding:

The most important thing is to do something that you know you’ll do well at. With law schools being a numbers-oriented business, that’s the most important piece of advice I can give.

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Making the Most of Your LSAT Practice Tests

As we come down to the wire here, practice tests are increasingly important as an LSAT practice tool. They’re hugely useful for replicating the experience of a real test, and for exposing you to more and more questions.

But a practice test is perhaps most useful for helping you identify what you don’t know – and if you aren’t testing with that in mind, then you’re far from optimizing those PTs. How can you make sure you’re getting the most out of those grueling hours? By focusing on your errors.

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Test Your Skills on the Toughest LSAT Logic Games Ever

With the October LSAT just around the corner, you should be in the refining stages for each of the three question types. This includes Logic Games, which – as perhaps the most learnable section – is a great place to invest some fine-tuning.

Once you’ve mastered the fundamentals, one great way to get prepared for LG is to challenge yourself with some of the hardest Games known to mankind. Additionally, practicing on these Games will familiarize you with the identifying characteristics of uniquely challenging games, enabling you to pick them out of the lineup on test day.

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One Month To Go ‘Til the October LSAT!

Don’t panic, but there’s exactly one month left before the October LSAT. Being four weeks out from test day is a frightening prospect, no matter where you’re at or where you want to be. We get that, but we also get that some students (you know who you are) psych themselves out a little extra around this time in their studies. Our goal here is to calm those neurotic perfectionists, and maybe also light a fire under some other folks’ bums.

With a month to go, you want to be near a mastery of the fundamentals. Within the next week or so, you should assess your diagramming, your RC annotating, and your skill at Grouping, Ordering, and Combination games. It’s important to spend a good amount of time drilling in these next couple weeks to hammer out any imperfections in your skills.

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What To Expect In Your First Week of Law School

If you, like me, are headed into your last week of freedom summer before starting your first year of law school, you may be trying to figure out what those first few weeks of school will look like. Because I’m more neurotic than you, I’ve saved you the trouble and pored over blogs and forums and orientation workbooks myself. Here’s what I’ve dug up:

Don’t worry too much about memorizing the Constitution or anything before class. Many students think they need to either catch up on obscure statutes or try to get an edge over their classmates; neither is the case. In fact, the general consensus seems to be that you should appreciate these last couple casebook-free weeks. Hit the beach, read some Nick Sparks, enjoy the end of your summer.

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Why Aren’t My Practice Test Scores Improving?

Hey, you baseball players out there – remember a year or two after tee-ball when your coach took you aside and told you that what you thought of as your graceful Hammer-of-Thor swing was, in fact, rubbish? And then you had to completely reconstruct your approach? Well, the process of studying for the LSAT is a little like that – here’s how.

The LSAT is a skills-based test with no prior knowledge required. This means that when you take your first diagnostic test, you’re naturally going to be coming up with strategies and methods and heuristics on the fly. This is great in the fight-or-flight circumstance that is that diagnostic test, but when you think about it, it’s obvious that the approach you conjure up under pressure is unlikely to be perfectly aligned with the most efficient and effective methods.

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Choosing a Law School: How Much Does Location Matter?

After you’ve combed through your stacks on stacks on stacks of acceptance letters, you’re on to one of the trickiest parts of the law school application process (after the Mauve Dinosaur game, of course): actually picking a school.

Among the myriad factors you’ll want to consider is location, location, location. Are you hoping to move back to your small town to practice after graduating? Are you dying to get out of suburbia? Itching to get to the Big Apple? Sunny California?

If so, it can be advisable to try and select a law school near your target area. For example, if you want to live and work in Los Angeles, then picking USC over Georgetown may make sense, despite the latter’s higher rank (lots to be said for the fickleness of rankings anyway — but you get the idea here).