Yuko Sin

Yuko is in his final year at Columbia Law School where he is a member of the Law Review and the founding (and only, as far as we can tell) member of the Gordon Ramsay and Law Society. In his spare time, Yuko likes perfecting his green curry paste—it might need more green chilies—, and riding his long board through Central Park.

He is fond of the Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT because it only requires him to concentrate for about a minute and a half at a time. LR is also half the test, so there’s more of it to love.

His writing is influenced by Stephen King, both because he enjoys horrifying readers—did you know your law school loan payments will be to the tune of about $3,000 a month?—and because he likes King's no nonsense, plain English writing style.

Yuko once had to teach his LSAT class with a screaming yoga group meeting next door. He thought the added stress perfectly simulated actual LSAT test conditions.

Author Archive:

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The Back Nine, 1L Edition

Grades are starting to roll in for 1Ls. Getting your grades from the first semester of law school can be devastating. But I have some advice that might help get you through the next two and a half years.

The first semester is by far the toughest semester of law school. Everyone is working harder than they ever will again — being as yet unbroken by the 1L curve.

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The 3L Winter Break

The third year of law school is regrettably still a thing. Most people will line up jobs at the start of their second year, which leaves you wondering what the point of the third year is. At any rate, here’s what I’ve been doing with my third year.

Traveling

Judging from Facebook statuses it seems like half the law school is studying or traveling abroad right now. I plan on taking my own trip to Japan in a few weeks. It’ll be my first time in the country and I’m extremely excited to try as much authentic Japanese food as time will allow.

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Law School Exams Are Different, In Ways Good And Bad

Law school exams are very different from what you’re used to in undergrad. In a way, undergrad exams are more fair. If you study a lot, memorize the material that you’ve covered, and mange to demonstrate that you’ve done all this work on the day of the exam by basically regurgitating the material in a mad dash to fill as many blue books as you can, you’ll do really well.

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Awww… Does the widdle baby have a dirty diaper? Let the administration fix it for you.

With the surprise election of Donald Trump, colleges have stepped in to deal with some of the fall out. The responses have ranged from therapeutic cuddle time with puppies and kittens at the University of Pennsylvania to safe spaces where students can receive counseling at the University of Michigan-Flint.

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Law School, Actually

Law school classes are very different from undergrad classes. Here’s how.

1. Cold Calling

One of the biggest differences from your undergrad experience is that most law school professors will cold call students from a seating chart or list of names. Law professors don’t like to wait for volunteers. What this means is that you’ll have to be prepared for most of your classes, instead of leaving things for last minute cram sessions at the end of a semester.

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Trials of the Century: Bush v. Gore

The 2000 Presidential Election—where Bush beat Gore, taking 271 Electoral College Votes to Gore’s 266, but losing the popular vote by about 500,000 votes (at least officially) —brought us Bush v. Gore.

An automatic machine recount revealed that the margin of victory in Florida was only 327 votes in favor of Bush. In the American winner-takes-all electoral system, this meant that Bush would take all of Florida’s 25 electoral votes and with them the presidency.

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Trials of the Century: The Lindbergh Baby Abduction

Charles Lindbergh, a completely unknown air-mail pilot, flew his way into history. He was the first person to complete a solo, nonstop flight from New York City to Paris. When he landed in Paris, a crowd of about 150,000 people were there to greet him. When he finally got back to New York City, a crowd of 200,000 welcomed him back. To put that into perspective, Beyonce on average only manages to turn out 45,000 people. Lindbergh was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor — an award usually reserved for combat veterans. He was named “Man of the Year” by the Times. The U.S. Post Office commemorated his flight with a 10-cent stamp. Lindbergh went on to use his fame to help popularize commercial aviation.