Yuko Sin

Yuko is in his final year at Columbia Law School where he is a member of the Law Review and the founding (and only, as far as we can tell) member of the Gordon Ramsay and Law Society. In his spare time, Yuko likes perfecting his green curry paste—it might need more green chilies—, and riding his long board through Central Park.

He is fond of the Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT because it only requires him to concentrate for about a minute and a half at a time. LR is also half the test, so there’s more of it to love.

His writing is influenced by Stephen King, both because he enjoys horrifying readers—did you know your law school loan payments will be to the tune of about $3,000 a month?—and because he likes King's no nonsense, plain English writing style.

Yuko once had to teach his LSAT class with a screaming yoga group meeting next door. He thought the added stress perfectly simulated actual LSAT test conditions.

Author Archive:

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So How Much Should I Really Be Studying for the LSAT?

Summertime and the prepppin’ is easy. Well, sort of. On the one hand you have tons of time now that you’re not in school (unless you’re a working man or woman), but on the other hand it’s very easy to overdo it. Here are my tips for getting the most out of your LSAT prep this summer.

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Going Above Above the Law: What to Take from Above the Law’s Law School Rankings

The new Above the Law ranking of the top 50 law schools in the U.S. is out again. And so is a self-critical review of the ranking, which is very fair, though a bit too in love with Yale. Want to know whether these rankings are the definitive rankings of law schools? Whether you’ll be a slightly less accomplished person if you attend, say, UCLA Law School (ranked #25) as opposed to, say, University of Illinois Law School (ranked #22). Here’s my take.

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The Last Push: Logic Games

The Logic Games section is your most important section on the LSAT. This is because most of your improvement on the LSAT will come from the Logic Games section, which is by far the most learnable section of the test.

So with two weekends between you and the LSAT, let’s go over what you should concentrate on in your last push for Logic Games greatness.

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A Rant Against the Bar from Someone Who, Unrelated, Just Started Studying for the Bar

The bar exam is a waste of time. I’m not sure why it exists. So here goes my rant against the bar exam.

Sophisticated parties like corporations, government departments, and law firms don’t need the bar exam to tell them who can handle their legal work. These organizations have both the self-interest and the ability to do their own vetting. In fact, pretty much everyone at these organizations is hired out of law school years before they sit for the bar exam. So who’s the bar exam supposed to protect?

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Managing LSAT Stress with Self-Care

Studying for the LSAT is like getting ready for an athletic event. To perform at your best, your body and mind need to be sharp. Here are some tips from a veteran LSAT instructor.

1. Get enough sleep

Nothing is more important. You need to sleep or else all sorts of things will go wrong with your body and ability to learn. Lack of sleep negatively affects your intelligence.

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The Best and Worst Law School Has to Offer

I just took my last law school exam yesterday. So I’m officially done with law school. Here are some of my thoughts on the best and worst law school has to offer.

The Best: Loads of Free Time

Look, your first year of law school will be fairly busy. But if you somehow end up sleep deprived and antisocial, or if you lose all your gains bro, then it’s your own fault.

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Before You Go Spouting Off About Free Speech, A Primer on the First Amendment

Gather ‘round folks, we’re about to learn a little free speech law. Very little.

UC Berkeley is having a tough time with student groups inviting speakers a majority of their students dislike. These incidents have provoked a lot of hot takes about the free speech and the First Amendment. So before you wage into your latest anonymous flame war on Twitter, Reddit, or Pinterest about this, let’s have a look at the law.