Yuko Sin

Yuko is in his final year at Columbia Law School where he is a member of the Law Review and the founding (and only, as far as we can tell) member of the Gordon Ramsay and Law Society. In his spare time, Yuko likes perfecting his green curry paste—it might need more green chilies—, and riding his long board through Central Park.

He is fond of the Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT because it only requires him to concentrate for about a minute and a half at a time. LR is also half the test, so there’s more of it to love.

His writing is influenced by Stephen King, both because he enjoys horrifying readers—did you know your law school loan payments will be to the tune of about $3,000 a month?—and because he likes King's no nonsense, plain English writing style.

Yuko once had to teach his LSAT class with a screaming yoga group meeting next door. He thought the added stress perfectly simulated actual LSAT test conditions.

Author Archive:

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Is the Bar Exam Getting Less Terrible?

Ugh, the bar exam. After the third year of law school, and closely following law review work, the bar exam is the next biggest drag in a young lawyer’s career. It’s supposed to be a minimum competency test, but making everyone cram the same general legal knowledge, no matter what kind of law they will go on to practice, only to never use this knowledge again, seems rather bizarre.

There are some signs of hope on the horizon, but first …

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Federal Prosecutors’ Role In Government

With the firing of the US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, Preet Bharara, people might like to know a bit more about the role of prosecutors in “the system.”

Prosecutors have enormous power. First, prosecutors decide whether to bring any charges at all against a given defendant. If a prosecutor decides not to bring charges against a defendant, no one can appeal this decision — it’s final.

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Rafting Down The Law School River. Literally.

The University of Colorado Law School is putting on a “Law of the Colorado River” seminar. This is hilariously outrageous.

First thing you need to know is that a seminar is exactly like a class but no one does the reading and everyone has to speak, every class. So essentially, once a week you exchange completely uninformed opinions with about a dozen overly (passive) aggressive people who grew up priding themselves on the fact that they love to argue.

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Is law school your way to #resist?

You think you want to go to law school to fight the Tangerine Voldemort in court?

Maybe you were inspired by the stories of lawyers camping out at the JFK International McDonalds trying to get immigrants, international students, and refugees out of detention? Or was it the judges who struck down Trump’s travel ban? What about Mexican-American judge in the Trump University case?

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Law Schools Take On the Immigration Ban

You’ll get overwhelmed with doing well on your exams during 1L. But once that’s over, you can actually do something that matters in more of a big picture sense. If your law school is worth anything, it’ll provide you with plenty of opportunities to serve. With Trump trying to ban immigrants from the country, let’s look at some of the ways law students are doing real work and doing a lot of good for immigrants.

NYU School of Law

NYU Law’s Immigrant Rights Clinic, partnering with WilmerHale, created a program aimed at helping NYU students and staff who are at a risk for deportation, as a result of Trump’s executive order, or otherwise. The NYU Immigration Rights Clinic itself has a broader mission, which includes litigation as well as immigrant’s rights advocacy on behalf of their clients.

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From the Vaults: Tackling Comparative Reading Passages on the LSAT

Reading Comprehension is probably the most ignored section of the LSAT. People tend to think something like, “I’ve been reading since I was five. If I can’t get it by now, I’m just gonna have to live with it.” But, Reading Comp isn’t reading as usual, so putting in the practice does pay off. Reading Comp’s peculiarities are most evident from the Comparative Reading passages. You get two passages and a single set of questions related to one or both passages. When’s the last time you had to go through something like that reading, say, the Huffington Post?

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CREW v. Trump

Soon you’ll start your law school journey. If you’re unfortunate enough to have to take constitutional law in your first year, you’ll be very happy to find out about Erwin Chemerinsky, the author of the most widely used con law supplement around. Don’t buy the casebook, buy Chemerinsky’s supplement instead.