Category Archive: Advice on Reading Comprehension

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Reading Comp IRL

We often recommend that students who want to get an advance start on their LSAT classes read dense publications such as The Economist as a way of preparing for the Reading Comprehension section. Today, we’re putting our money where our proverbial mouth is, and taking it one step further: We’re guiding you through an Economist article as though it were a Reading Comprehension passage.

When selecting an article, I decided to find an article in the “Science and Technology” category, since I know science-related passages can be scary for students. The lucky winner? “Strange Signals from the Sky May Be Signs of Aliens.”

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From the Vaults: Tackling Comparative Reading Passages on the LSAT

Reading Comprehension is probably the most ignored section of the LSAT. People tend to think something like, “I’ve been reading since I was five. If I can’t get it by now, I’m just gonna have to live with it.” But, Reading Comp isn’t reading as usual, so putting in the practice does pay off. Reading Comp’s peculiarities are most evident from the Comparative Reading passages. You get two passages and a single set of questions related to one or both passages. When’s the last time you had to go through something like that reading, say, the Huffington Post?

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LSAT Reading Comprehension: It Ain’t What You Think

It’s just words, right? WRONG. If you’re planning to take the LSAT, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve taken other standardized tests before — the SAT or ACT, perhaps even the GRE or GMAT. These tests all have one thing in common: reading comprehension. On the surface, all reading comp looks pretty similar. There’s a

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How To Do Reading Comprehension

That’s a big promise up there in the title of this post. I will deliver on that promise in just a moment, but let me just make clear what I’m not promising. I’m not about to give you “two weird tricks to ace Reading Comp.” I’m not “the guy the makers of the LSAT hate.” What I’m going to give you is a broad understanding of what you’re being asked to understand — and, just as importantly, what you’re not being asked to understand — in a Reading Comp passage.

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Boy, this Reading Comp passage is… Zzzzzzz….

There is a Reading Comprehension passage that we cover in Lesson 6 of the Blueprint course that is dedicated to explaining the usefulness of analyzing fossilized pollen grains for the purpose of understanding the history of agriculture in Ireland. If you fell asleep before finishing that sentence, just imagine how how hard it is to keep your eyes peeled while reading the dang thing.

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How to Tackle Brutal Reading Comp Passages

You’ve been practicing your reading every day for the past two months, reading every “Warning: Slippery Floor” sign and nutritional label at the grocery store, but lo and behold, test day comes, and you get a reading passage with difficult subject matter. It’s something science-y, where every other word in the first paragraph is followed by a comma and its definition.

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How to Reading Comp

Many a jaded LSAT student has rolled his/her eyes and said, “I don’t need to study for the Reading Comprehension section – I already know how to read!”

The fact that you are reading this blog post means you are probably correct about the second part of that statement. But the first part – no way. Sure, you’ve probably been reading more or less since the days when “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” was the pinnacle of entertainment options, but the skills required to do well on the Reading Comprehension section are a very different beast. Here are my top tips for improving your Reading Comprehension score.

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How To Get The Most Out Of Your Reading Comprehension Studying

After a go at a Reading Comprehension passage or two, you’ve come to realize that Reading Comprehension might not be a total breeze just because you know how to read. But then you hit your next mental block, which is the belief that studying for RC is pointless. How can a few months of studying change the way you read? You’ve been reading for hundreds of months—since you were a wee thing—and how you read now is just ingrained in you, right?

Be honest, how often do you regularly read something that is multiple paragraphs long while keeping track of multiple things at once? (The pictures in the BuzzFeed “articles” don’t count as paragraphs). With the reading for your classes, you’re either reading for the facts or for a general sense of what’s going on so you can raise your hand at least once a class (or every other class). And, you have as much time as you’re willing to spend to reread paragraphs to make sure you have the right idea.

RC is completely different from the reading you typically do, which means that how to do RC is actually not already ingrained in you. It’s a skill set that you can master with practice.