Category Archive: General LSAT Advice

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RSVP to Our Webinar: “Everything You Need to Know About the July LSAT”

For the first time ever, there will be an LSAT administered in July 2018. This test administration has been shrouded in mystery. What time will it start? Will the test be released? How should I adjust my study schedule for it? If I want to retake after the June LSAT, will I still have time to sign up for the July test?

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The Typical Argument Types Typically Go Wrong on the LSAT

Describe questions (questions that ask of an argument’s “method of reasoning” or how the argument “proceeds”) have kind of a funny place on the LSAT. On the one hand, they’re not terribly common. You might see a couple on test day, or you might just as easily not see any at all. But the skill they test, describing reasoning with the subject matter abstracted out, is important to a lot of things on the LSAT.

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Breaking Down Arguments Like a Pro

Studying for the LSAT is a difficult and time-consuming pursuit. For one thing, it takes a long time to build familiarity with the way the test is set up. Furthermore, unlike most of the tests people have experienced their academic careers, the LSAT tests skills, not knowledge — so you can’t rote-memorize your way to a good LSAT score.

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On the LSAT, Confidence Is Key

Something that rarely gets discussed in LSAT preparation, despite being extremely important, is the role that an individual’s confidence plays in their success. We talk at length about how to solve questions correctly, and how to manage time on particular sections. But another, ever-present factor that can significantly impact an LSAT outcome is confidence.

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Tiers Without Fears

Most LSAT Prep systems approach ordering games in more or less the same way. First, we start by showing you the classic 1:1 ordering game. Some call these “basic linear” games or something to that effect. But the idea is: you have a certain number of players you have to order, and a certain number of places to put those players, and those two numbers are the same. You have to watch eight Netflix series? On a 1:1 ordering game, you’ll watch them one at a time, first through eighth. Or you have to visit six fast casual eateries? Well you’ll visit one per day, from Monday to Saturday.

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Making Deductions in Ordering Games

Even without any practice, an LSAT student could take home a section of logic games and solve it by slowly working through each question by process of elimination. The problem with the LSAT, as we all know, is that this is an exam with strict time constraints, and you just can’t master the Logic Games section in a 35 minute period without using deductions.

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Getting to Know the Implication Family

With classes starting up for the June LSAT, we thought it would be a good idea to do a post covering one of the foundational groups of questions you’ll encounter on the LSAT. At Blueprint, we subdivide one of the big sections of the LSAT — the biggest section, in fact, Logical Reasoning — into three “families.” We’re going to zoom in on one of those families today: the Implication family.

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Practice Exam 1? Forget About It

April just started, which means that nearly every one of the Blueprint spring classroom courses, which prepare aspiring law students for the June LSAT, has begun. Which means, if you’re one of the many Blueprint students in these classes, you have just taken Practice Exam 1. Or, if you’re using Blueprint’s online course and you’re following the schedule we laid out for you, you’ve recently taken Practice Exam 1. Or — we’re an inclusive bunch — maybe you’re using a different study plan to prepare for the June LSAT, and you’re just here for a little extra advice. In that case, you should have recently taken a baseline diagnostic test before you began your studies in earnest. And hey, if you want to call that “Practice Exam 1” like all the cool Blueprint students, you do your thing.

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Getting Your Study Game Right for the LSAT

If there’s one thing pre-law students have down pat, it’s studying. You don’t decide to go to law school unless you have certain tendencies, and those specific tendencies often correlate with the types of traits that lead a student to, say, take on an extra research project or start an essay — gasp — the week before it’s due instead of the night before it’s due. Basically, pre-law students tend to be pretty damn good at studying.

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Get Some More Pre-LSAT Training!

The June LSAT’s a little more than couple months away, but if you’re still waiting to start your LSAT studying, there are a few things you can now do to build good habits. Last week, we broke down an article like you would on the LSAT Reading Comp section. We’re going to do the same thing again today.