Category Archive: Admissions

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Getting Personal On The Personal Statement

I have a confession to make: My personal statement was awful. Just ridiculous and awful. I got into the school I wanted to nonetheless because of my LSAT score, and really only because of my LSAT score. With three years of law school since and many years after guiding students in the admissions process, I’ve learned a lot about what a winning personal statement looks like and what doesn’t.

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From the Vaults: The Biggest (and Most Obvious) Mistakes to Avoid in Your Personal Statement

Writing a law school personal statement is hard. Your job is to tell law schools about yourself and about why you want to and should go to law school. It’s a challenge to come up with the right topic and figure out the best way to present it.

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From the Vaults: A Brief Rundown of the Law School Admissions Timeline

“Tick-tock,” says the applications timeline clock. “Stop ticking,” says the law school applicant.

Today’s post is a rundown of when you should be doing what when it comes to applying for law school starting in Fall of 2017. (If you’re looking to start this coming Fall and have yet to get the ball rolling, this post is also for you, because you’re too late, bucko, and it’s Fall 2017 for you, also.)

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The Revenge of LSAC

We told you a few months ago about the beginning of what is now a law school admissions trend (if two counts as a trend, that is): law schools accepting the GRE in lieu of the LSAT. If you’re reading this blog, you likely know that the GRE is the standardized test those going on to graduate school — rather than a professional school, like like law school — take. It tests math and verbal skills, whereas the LSAT tests logic and argumentation.

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An Introduction to Law School Admissions

You want to be a lawyer. We want you to be a lawyer, and we can help. There are just a few teensy-weensy things you’ve got to do before you pull up to the courthouse in your Maserati and your ostrich leather, Louis Vuitton suit.

Like what? Well, first of all, you have to get into law school.

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Hey, Blueprint! What LSAT score do I need?

The LSAT, as you may know, is not a pass/fail exam. Rather, it’s based on a scale of 120 to 180. If you get a 120, you won’t be going to law school, and, if you get a 180, you pretty much have your pick of schools to go to. Not surprisingly, most people don’t get within 10 points of either extreme. Very often I get the question from a student, “What LSAT score do I need?” Well, that depends on a few things. So, let me ask you a few questions, and maybe we can figure it out together.

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5 Ways to Make Law School Adcom Fall in Love with You

What are admissions committees at top law schools looking for when reviewing applications? What sorts of qualities, skills, and experiences do they seek? What types of people do they want in their next law school class? And what can you do to highlight these sought-after characteristics?

How can you present yourself so that the law school adcoms are instantly smitten by your application?

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March Law School Madness

March Madness is upon us! I hope your NCAA tournament bracket is doing better than mine (c’mon Michigan State, really?). In keeping with the spirit of the season, this post is going to present a “mini-bracket” with different law schools facing off. To ratchet up the excitement, we’re going to start with a Final Four.

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You are not (entirely) an LSAT score.

A few weeks ago, we published a post about Wake Forest’s attempt to start admitting students with GRE scores instead of LSAT scores. At the time, the motives behind the effort seemed at least somewhat suspect. Law schools are ranked, in large part, according to the LSAT scores of their admitted students, so by padding out their numbers with GRE-takers, a school could be more selective among its LSAT applicants, thus improving their numbers and climbing the rankings.

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A Brief Rundown of the Law School Admissions Timeline

“Tick-tock,” says the applications timeline clock. “Stop ticking,” says the law school applicant.

Today’s post is a rundown of when you should be doing what when it comes to applying for law school starting in Fall of 2017. (If you’re looking to start this coming Fall and have yet to get the ball rolling, this post is also for you, because you’re too late, bucko, and it’s Fall 2017 for you, also.)