Category Archive: Legal Life

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A Starting Salary of $190K?!

A short time ago, a so-called “biglaw” firm in New York created a stir in the legal community by announcing starting salaries of $190K. Over the last week, a growing number of firms has matched the new salary scale, which is sure to catch the eye of many prospective law students. This post is going to cover (1) how to get a job offer from these types of firms and (2) what those jobs entail for new associates.

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Legal Field Trips: Personal Injury Law

To complete our series on various legal practices areas, we’re going to dive into the much maligned world of personal injury law.

Personal injury lawyers are often pejoratively referred to as “ambulance chasers” because they — more in myth than fact — are thought to follow ambulances to the scenes of accidents in order to pick up new, injured clients. So, is it fair to consider these lawyers the used car salesmen of the legal world? And what exactly do these lawyers do?

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Legal Field Trips: Appellate Litigation

For the last couple weeks, we’ve been doing a series on various areas of the law. So far, we’ve covered securities law and criminal law. This week we’re going to take up appellate litigation. While this is a relatively niche area, it is another one that a lot of people seem to talk about before and during law school.

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Legal Field Trips: Securities Law

Many law students and applicant generally profess a desire to “be a lawyer” but have no real understanding of what practice area they want to work in. We’re going to kickoff a new series that provides a quick primer on certain fields of law. Naturally, this isn’t going to be an exhaustive study of life as an “x” lawyer, but it’ll help give you some insight into how the actual practice of law works.

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A Primer on Disability Law

A student at University of Oregon Law School has sued the school for failing to accommodate his disability. In related news, Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos seemed unaware in her confirmation hearing what federal disability requirements were for disabled students (although the context was primary school). Now seems like a good time to discuss the basics of disability law, primarily focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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Amazon Echo and the Fourth Amendment

Our generation is used to giving up control over vast amounts of personal information. From Facebook check-ins to cell site location information, the police have readily ascertainable digital footprints to track virtually all of our movements. The question, which the Supreme Court will likely have to address going forward, is how much digital information can be presented in court without violating either the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable searches.

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Trials of the Century: Bush v. Gore

The 2000 Presidential Election—where Bush beat Gore, taking 271 Electoral College Votes to Gore’s 266, but losing the popular vote by about 500,000 votes (at least officially) —brought us Bush v. Gore.

An automatic machine recount revealed that the margin of victory in Florida was only 327 votes in favor of Bush. In the American winner-takes-all electoral system, this meant that Bush would take all of Florida’s 25 electoral votes and with them the presidency.

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Trials of the Century: The Lindbergh Baby Abduction

Charles Lindbergh, a completely unknown air-mail pilot, flew his way into history. He was the first person to complete a solo, nonstop flight from New York City to Paris. When he landed in Paris, a crowd of about 150,000 people were there to greet him. When he finally got back to New York City, a crowd of 200,000 welcomed him back. To put that into perspective, Beyonce on average only manages to turn out 45,000 people. Lindbergh was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor — an award usually reserved for combat veterans. He was named “Man of the Year” by the Times. The U.S. Post Office commemorated his flight with a 10-cent stamp. Lindbergh went on to use his fame to help popularize commercial aviation.