Category Archive: LSAT

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No matter how it goes, PE2 will still go better than these people’s weeks

If you’re enrolled in a Blueprint course, or if you have a reasonable, scheduled study plan, you’re probably taking Practice Exam 2 very soon. Maybe this weekend.

It will be the first full exam you’ve taken since you were stumbled through Practice Exam 1 like a newborn fawn trying to find its footing. Back then you had just started your LSAT studying. You were an LSAT neophyte. You probably went in without many expectations. Maybe you didn’t even know what was going to be on the exam. “I don’t know … some stuff about the law I guess?” is perhaps what you thought. You may have even called it the El Ess Ay Tee like some slacked-jawed yokel.

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Should I re-do Logic Games?

There is a surprisingly broad range of opinions when it comes to the question of re-doing Logic Games. I find that many students assume their time is better spent working on material they’ve never seen before, instead of repeating games they’ve already tried. Meanwhile, some LSAT tutors advocate re-doing games as many as 10 times to glean the maximum amount of knowledge from them. I’d argue that the truth, as is often the case, lies somewhere in the middle.

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Watch out for comparative statements … it’s better than the alternative

I’m taller than the average Olympic gymnast. Does that make me tall? Likewise I’m shorter than the average NBA center. Does that make me short? The answer to both questions, of course, is no. “Taller” and “shorter” are comparative statements. They say something about my height compared to certain others, but only by comparison. “Tall” and “short” are absolute statements.

Comparative statements do not prove absolute statements. Absolute statements do not prove comparative statements. The LSAT tests the distinction between them quite often, in a few ways.

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Marshall, the film: Our Review

Thurgood Marshall: Second-ever Special Counsel to the NAACP. All-time record holder for most civil rights cases argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, where he boasted an impressive record of 29-3. The guy who successfully extended voting rights, ended racially restrictive housing covenants, desegregated law schools and grad schools. Oh, and later public schools in general in a little case called Brown v. Board of Education. A titanic figure in public interest law and impact litigation. The first African-American Supreme Court Justice, a position he used to tireless defend individual’s constitutional rights from the bench.

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Don’t Miss Out! Only a Few Hours Left to Get 20% Off Tutoring!

I’m a big fan of sports movies from the 70’s and 80’s. Almost inevitably, these movies contain a sports training montage, where you see clips of the main character training and improving under the tutelage of his grizzled mentor. This is most prominently featured in the Rocky movies (truly American classics…except number 5, which is terrible). During the montage (which usually feature some inspirational music, a la “Eye of the Tiger”), the hero starts out terrible, gets frustrated by his failures, gradually improves, and then masters his craft.

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All the amazing ways the common fallacies can help you

Earlier this week, we gave you a rundown on some of the most common fallacies on the LSAT. It is, of course, helpful to understand those fallacies for Flaw questions in the Logical Reasoning section. However, familiarity with common flaws also helps you in other sections of the LSAT.

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A few common fallacies that you just gotta know

Flaw questions are one of the most common types of Logical Reasoning questions on the LSAT. That’s reason enough to study them thoroughly. Furthermore, the concepts that underlie Flaw questions show up in myriad other questions in the LSAT.

So flawed arguments are a big deal. We’ll have more on the importance of flawed arguments later in the week, but for today we’ll look at a few of the most common logical fallacies you’ll see in Flaw questions and on the LSAT in general. The better you get at spotting these, the easier this cursed test gets.

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Our Fall Tutoring Sale is On! 20% Off All Tutoring Purchases!

Hey, LSAT studier. Pull up a chair, let’s have a chat. Mondays, am I right? I know.

All right, enough with the small talk. You must have a lot on your plate right now. Classes, work, organizations to which you are a contributing member, familial responsibilities, trying to find time for bae. To say nothing of this whole studying-for-the-LSAT business. I don’t know how you do it.

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types: