Category Archive: LSAT

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Blueprint’s Guide to LSAT Testing Centers

The LSAT is supposed to be the great equalizer for law school applicants. It’s tough for admissions officers to compare a mechanical engineering major at MIT with a 3.6 GPA to a communications major with a 4.2 GPA at Central Nowhere University. But everyone, allegedly, takes the same LSAT. So it’s theoretically fair to compare someone who got a 160 to someone who got a 152. The Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) takes great care to “equate” each LSAT, to ensure that, for example, a 160 on one LSAT administration means the same thing as a 160 on a different LSAT administration. So everyone takes the same LSAT, no matter which administration you take or where you take the exam.

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The LSAT vs. The Bar Exam

The formal part of your legal education is book-ended by two exams. At the front, the LSAT and, at the end, the bar exam. While you’re probably familiar — or in the process of becoming familiar — with the LSAT, the bar exam is foreign to most applicants and law students. This post is going to compare and contrast the LSAT with the bar exam to help demystify what’s ahead.

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RSVP to the Webinars We’re Hosting on Thursday!

It’s March, which means there are a few things on your To Do list. Set your clocks ahead for daylight saving time (check). Remember to call it daylight saving time and not daylight savings time, because time is a construct and it is not trying to like, deposit daylight into a bank account at Wells Fargo (check). Fill out your college basketball springtime tournament of chaos bracket (we’ll get around to it). Remember that referring to said college basketball tournament as “M—- M——” risks infringing upon the NCAA’s intellectual property and courts legal action (check). Find something green to wear on St. Patrick’s Day (umm, I’m pretty sure I have an old t-shirt somewhere). Remember to Google why we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day so that one pedantic friend of yours doesn’t correct you on St. Patrick’s Day (still need to get around to that — I think it’s about snakes or Protestants or something though). And so on.

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Retaking the LSAT? Here are your next steps

Imagine yourself a month after your LSAT — you’re refreshing your email for the 50th time that day, anxiously awaiting your score, and when you finally get it, those three digits don’t add up to the LSAT score you hoped for.

For some of you who recently took the February LSAT, you don’t have to imagine. Maybe you recognized going into the exam that you were underprepared. Maybe you were shocked that the score wasn’t nearly as high as your practice scores. Either way, what are you going to do about it?

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Understanding Your LSAT Score: The “Curve,” Explained

In a surprise move, LSAT scores were released late last night (so much for day-old promises, LSAC), which means a bunch of LSAT students have a shiny new LSAT score. You’ll hopefully hear lots of score recipients gushing about their scores, and you’ll probably hear some folks who are bummed out as well (we’ll have a post for those guys in the next couple days).

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Feb 2018 Test Takers: Your Score’s Coming Wednesday

Well, it’s official: the score release date for the February 2018 LSAT will be Wednesday, March 7. So this Wednesday, one day earlier than the scheduled release date of Thursday, March 8.

In a kindly worded and #motivational note posted on LSAC students’ accounts, LSAC CEO Kellye Testy announced the score release date. Really, she did. Take a look at your LSAC account right now if you don’t believe me. I’ll wait.

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The LSAT’s New, Simple (Hopefully Fool-Proof) Score-Cancellation Policy

It happens to us all …

You have just finished a grueling, four-hour LSAT. After of months of study, you have finally reached the finish line. The proctor reads, with all the pomp and ceremony of a TSA agent beckoning the next in line, perfunctory congratulations. She then reads one final direction: you have the option to cancel your score, sight unseen, either by checking a small box on your answer sheet right now or by filing out a form through your online LSAC account.