Category Archive: LSAT

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LSAT Exam Day: What to Bring (And What Not to Bring)

June LSAT test day is almost upon us, and you should have everything you need for the LSAT ready in advance so that you don’t end up scrambling Monday morning. Be sure to check out LSAC’s page of regulations for LSAT test day; here are some highlights of what to bring and what not to bring.

Item #1 to Bring to LSAT Test Day: Yourself. If you decide you’re not ready for the June LSAT, visit the LSAC website before midnight ET Sunday and withdraw from the LSAT to avoid an absence on your record.

Item #2 to Bring to LSAT Test Day: Your admission ticket with photo attached. You can print the ticket from LSAC’s website. The photo is a relatively new requirement for the LSAT, but you should not overlook it. LSAC is extremely picky about your photo.

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Predictions for the January 2019 LSAT

For the January exam, we’re going to switch our typical predictions post up a little bit.

For the past few years, we’ve jokingly made hyper-specific and ridiculous predictions for each LSAT that, unsurprisingly, were not borne out by the actual exam. The “joke” was that making actual predictions on the LSAT was a fool’s errand, since you won’t know exactly what the Logical Reasoning questions, Reading Comp passages, or Logic Games would be about. And, even if you did, that knowledge wouldn’t be of much use. So, we’d make a few winking, sort-of-inane predictions, and then remind students that as long as they were comfortable with the concepts that get tested on every LSAT, they’d do great, irrespective of what would end up showing up on the test.

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Last Week Before the January 2019 LSAT Checklist

For January 2019 LSAT-takers, there are roughly 168 hours (that’s one week) standing between you and your dream score. With so much to keep in your brain until exam day, I want to relieve you of some of the effort of figuring out everything you have left to do in your last week before the exam. There are some things you absolutely need to do before you can take the exam, and there are a few more things that I highly recommend that you do in your last week in order to give yourself the best preparation for the LSAT.

This is my checklist of all of those things you should do in your week before the LSAT:

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Will the Digital LSAT Change Law School Admissions?

To put it politely, the legal industry is not exactly known for its rapid adaptation to change. In light of that fact, with the recent changes to the LSAT — the shift to a digital format and the addition of twice as many testing dates per year — there are seismic shifts happening in the prelaw world this year.

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A New Day in LSAT: A New Test Calls for a New Online LSAT Course & Updated LSAT Prep

2019 is a year of change in the world of LSAT, not the least of which is the move to a tablet-based test and a take-home Writing Sample. Law school applications are also on the rise and the GRE is still trying to be “a thing.” Elsewhere, people are busier than ever and sacrificing quality for the sake of flexibility is becoming the norm.

At Blueprint, we’re at the forefront of the LSAT and the law school admissions process as a whole. Our online platform has been setting standards for online LSAT prep for years and our methodologies have been helping students average 11-point score increases. Still, we heard our students’ need for more modern, affordable, and flexible LSAT prep. The LSAT is changing, so we are too. Introducing: The new Blueprint Online Anytime Course.

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Top 5 Things You Need to Know About the Digital LSAT

After years of “will they/won’t they,” LSAC has finally decided to enter the 21st century and move away from the paper-and-pencil LSAT beginning in July 2019. We can grumble, we can complain, we can blame Gen Z, but love it or not, the LSAT digital revolution is coming. LSAC has been slowly releasing information bit by bit, and although we’ve diligently reported all the latest developments, it can still be a lot to digest at once. So, we’ve determined the top five things you need to know about the digital LSAT, regardless if you’re a seasoned LSAT vet or you’re taking the test for the first time this year.

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Changes to the LSAT Writing Sample, Coming in June

Ever since LSAC announced that it would switch-up the format of the LSAT from the staid, old, traditional pencil-and-paper exam to the gleaming, new digital LSAT, we’ve been covering — quite extensively, I’d say — the changes coming in 2019. But we haven’t yet given proper due to the changes coming for the writing sample, which will debut in June 2019.

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Classes for One of the LSAT Paper LSATs Start Soon

For the lucky few in college, your winter break has come to an end. We say “lucky” because I don’t think anyone would mind checking out from the routine for three weeks. The start of the semester and the new year brings forth ambitious resolutions and some stark reminders. For those interested in going to law school, one of those reminders is to take (or to retake) the LSAT.

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January LSAT Deadlines Are Here

The January 2019 LSAT is just a couple weeks away, which also means that the deadlines to change or get out of this exam have arrived. Students signed up for the January LSAT have until today, January 11 at 11:59 pm Eastern Time, to change the test location or postpone the LSAT to another date (both requiring you to pay an extra $125). And today is also the deadline to withdraw from the LSAT altogether for a refund of $50.