Category Archive: LSAT

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Tags, You’re It

Studying for Reading Comprehension is tough. The passages are long, about obscure topics that have almost no impact on your life, and written with a heightened academic tone that is, frankly, boring.

For reference, here is a list of some fun topics from recent LSATs: the legitimacy of dowsing, the misleading nature of brain scans, the fascinating career trajectory of a lacquer artist who became an interior designer and architect, the debate over why Mesolithic-era humans cleared pathways in the woodlands, the demarcations found on clay tablets from Sumer, the rehabilitation of a long-discredited theory by new research, the epistemological value of negative evidence.

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The FAQs for Soft MBTs: Part 2

Earlier this week, we went over the basics of Soft Must Be True questions to help you get started on this super prevalent question type. Now that we have the ins and outs of Soft Must Be True 101 covered, we’re going to get into some advanced strategies to help you master these questions. So let’s get started with Part 2 of the FAQs of Soft MBTs.

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If you diagram, you should look for deductions

We’ve spilled a lot of ink on this blog about how to diagram conditional statements, but you may be wondering why you should even bother acquiring this skill — what good is being able to diagram, anyway??

The answer, of course, is that it helps you understand what conclusions can validly be drawn from a set of information. Today we’ll discuss the types of valid inferences that can be made from conditional statements — and stay tuned next week, when we’ll circle back to talk about what LSAT question types most often require diagramming.

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Getting Started with Reading Comprehension

Some students like to ignore the Reading Comprehension section of the LSAT. Maybe they find the passages boring. I have no idea why.

But I think that many students don’t give Reading Comp its due because it seems familiar and that familiarity breeds complacency. You know how to read, after all — that you’ve made it this far into this blog post is ample evidence.

But go back and check your most recent LSAT practice exam. Did you nail the Reading Comp section? If not, you have some work to do. LSAT Reading Comp may seem deceptively familiar, but it’s different. You can improve your score, but it takes the right approach.

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The FAQs for Soft MBTs: Part 1

If you’ve just started a Blueprint course — or if you otherwise have a reasonable study plan that includes learning a sound strategic approach for each Logical Reasoning question type — you’ve probably just encountered the Soft Must Be True question. You know, the ones that say stuff like “If the above statements are true, which of the following is most strongly supported?”

This post is going to give you some advice to firm up your approach to these Soft Must Be True questions. All it takes a hardened resolve and solid practice, and these can become, more or less, Softball Must Be True questions.

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September 2017 Post-LSAT Carnival

It’s been a week since the Law School Admissions Council bequeathed the September 2017 LSAT to a nation of lawyers-to-be (unless you live in parts of Florida, in which case, good luck when the exam comes around to you!). And since this momentous bequeathing, the internet has been ablaze with hot takes on the exam. Well, more accurately, a very specific niche of chatty soon-to-be law students have been talking about the exam, mostly trying to figure out which section was the experimental.

But there has been some interesting and lively discussions surrounding the exam on all corners of the internet, so we thought we’d bring back an old favorite — the post-LSAT Carnival — to round up the chatter about the September exam.

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A Legal Primer, for Those Annoying RC Passages About the Law

One of the best things about the LSAT is that you don’t really have to remember any substantive information. Sure, you have to learn some techniques to answer questions, but you don’t have to know any legal facts (and believe me, once you take the bar exam, you’ll truly appreciate how wonderful that difference is).

And yet, many recent LSATs have had Reading Comprehension passages on the law and legal processes.

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Last Round of Fall Classes Start This Saturday!

Visualize next year, around this time. Do you see yourself starting law school? If so, the December LSAT is your last chance for many law schools. If you want to prepare for the December LSAT, Blueprint’s last round of classes for the fall starts this weekend. It’s time to get started or wait another year.

The classes starting this weekend all have their first session this Saturday, 9/23.

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From the Vault: Your Path to Becoming an LSAT Jedi Begins Practice Exam 1

Because many Blueprint classes started last weekend — which means that many Blueprint students just took Practice Exam 1 — we’re running an old post about what you should take away from that potentially demoralizing experience. If you just took that exam, and need a little pick me up, take this advice from former Blueprint instructor and Columbia Law alum Philip Mayer …