Category Archive: LSAT

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Southern California: RSVP to Southwestern’s Law Day

Are you a prospective law student? Will you be in the LA area November 11? If so, you don’t want to miss Southwestern’s Law Day. It’ll be at Southwestern from 1:30 to 6 pm, and if you go you’ll get a $400 discount off a Blueprint classroom course. You’ll also get your application fee to Southwestern waived. With all those discounts you might even be able to fly to LA for the event and still come out ahead. But don’t book your tickets without sending your RSVP — the event may be free but you do need to let them know you’re coming.

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Law-Themed Pumpkin Carving Stencils

Today is the last day of Halloween Week at Ghost Strongly Supported, which means it’s soon time to take off the masks we donned for this ghastly holiday and return to being Most Strongly Supported, your premier stop for LSAT tips and law school news.

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What Your Favorite Halloween Candy Says About You

All Hallows’ Eve occurring on a Tuesday this year nicely bifurcated Halloween into two separate holidays. On Saturday, it was Adult Halloween (Halloweaned?), in which adults put on their most topical and/or sensual costumes (which reminds us, you still have time to post your best costume or pumpkin carving using #booprint to have a shot at winning a $100 Amazon gift card) and imbibed all matters of devilish elixirs. And the real holiday this Tuesday will be Kid’s Halloween (Halloweaning?), with age-appropriate costumes and candy and solicitations of tricks and/or treats.

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These Spooky Logic Games Are More Trick than Treat

Halloween Week continues here at Ghost Strongly Supported (speaking of which, have you entered our costume/pumpkin-carving contest yet??) with something truly spooky — we’ve got a super special set of Logic Games for you, hot and fresh out the proverbial kitchen.

We cooked up these games ourselves at Blueprint, using real LSAT logic games as an inspiration. If you’re truly stumped, we’ve provided some quick tips below to help you find deductions, but you should attempt the games on your own before checking out those hints.

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Win a $100 Amazon Gift Card with the Best LSAT or Law-Related Costume or Pumpkin Carving

Halloween is creeping up on you, just ready to jump out from around a corner and scare you. Halloween and the LSAT just go together like, well, if you’re studying for the LSAT it’s probably taken over your entire life including your Halloween costume.

We’re here for you. The LSAT consumes our lives, too. We’re going to be celebrating Halloween for the next week. Call it Booprint. We’re even going to be offering a prize. The best LSAT or law-related costume or pumpkin carving will win a $100 Amazon gift card. All you need to do is post it on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter with the hastag #booprint by 12PM PDT on 10/31.

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Reading Comp and Logic Games

Yesterday, we took a detailed look at the Logical Reasoning sections on the September 2017 LSAT. We found a set of sections that had a pretty typical distribution of question types, but that leaned heavily on conditionality. Overall, they were a set a pretty mild LR section. But what about the other two sections, Reading Comp and Logic Games? Everyone said the former was crazy difficult, and the latter crazy easy. We’ll dive into those, and this exam’s curve, below.

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

On September 16, 2017, droves of people — those hoping to soon begin their legal tutelage at an accredited institution of jurisprudence — took by land, sea, and air to ad hoc testing centers opened by the Law School Admissions Council of Elders. At these testing centers, these legal apprentices in waiting were given a test. Their answers to this test could open pathways to a brighter legal future. A chance to matriculate to institutions at which the sharpest legal minds are forged. The exam these aspirants would take was called the September 2017 LSAT. And unless were unfortunate enough to be in central Florida; Boise, Idaho; Savannah, Georgia; or Richmond, Virginia, take this test is what they did.

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No matter how it goes, PE2 will still go better than these people’s weeks

If you’re enrolled in a Blueprint course, or if you have a reasonable, scheduled study plan, you’re probably taking Practice Exam 2 very soon. Maybe this weekend.

It will be the first full exam you’ve taken since you were stumbled through Practice Exam 1 like a newborn fawn trying to find its footing. Back then you had just started your LSAT studying. You were an LSAT neophyte. You probably went in without many expectations. Maybe you didn’t even know what was going to be on the exam. “I don’t know … some stuff about the law I guess?” is perhaps what you thought. You may have even called it the El Ess Ay Tee like some slacked-jawed yokel.

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Should I re-do Logic Games?

There is a surprisingly broad range of opinions when it comes to the question of re-doing Logic Games. I find that many students assume their time is better spent working on material they’ve never seen before, instead of repeating games they’ve already tried. Meanwhile, some LSAT tutors advocate re-doing games as many as 10 times to glean the maximum amount of knowledge from them. I’d argue that the truth, as is often the case, lies somewhere in the middle.

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Watch out for comparative statements … it’s better than the alternative

I’m taller than the average Olympic gymnast. Does that make me tall? Likewise I’m shorter than the average NBA center. Does that make me short? The answer to both questions, of course, is no. “Taller” and “shorter” are comparative statements. They say something about my height compared to certain others, but only by comparison. “Tall” and “short” are absolute statements.

Comparative statements do not prove absolute statements. Absolute statements do not prove comparative statements. The LSAT tests the distinction between them quite often, in a few ways.