Category Archive: News

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Colin Kaepernick’s Case Against the NFL

I’m a big San Francisco 49ers fan. I suffered through the 2000s, enjoyed three years of playoff football, and watched as the team crashed harder than any other franchise in recent history. Paralleling that crash was Colin Kaepernick’s career trajectory. Kaepernick went from starting in a Super Bowl to out of a job within a few years.

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There Were A LOT of Horror Stories from the September 2017 LSAT

Imagine this: You, a proud Idahoan, have spent months preparing for the LSAT, which the Law School Admission Council said would be held on Saturday, September 16, the year of our Lord Kellye Testy two thousand and seventeen, and would begin promptly at 8:30 am, Mountain Daylight Time. You purchased a not-inexpensive admission ticket, which again repeated the precise time at which you would report to your testing center at Boise State University. You studied vigorously to prepare for the test.

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A Crash Course on the First Amendment

Free speech has been in the news in a big way this week. Between the NFL protests, to Trump’s less-than-diplomatic comments regarding said protests, to Berkeley’s canceled “free speech” week, we’ve been hearing about the First Amendment and free speech a lot. But apparently, a study on college students shows that no one understands the First Amendment (although the validity of this study has been debated). This post is designed to give you an overview of the tradition of free speech and the First Amendment, so (at the very least) you don’t sound like an idiot on Facebook.

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Are more students going to law school as a reaction to Trump?

Erica Jansson is excited to be in law school.

Fresh off the June 2017 Law School Admission Test, she just completed her first week at Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles. “The first week has been all about legal writing,” she says, flashing A Lawyer Writes tucked into the crook of her arm as evidence.

Erica works as a legal clerk by day, and attends Southwestern’s evening program at night. She’s also the mother of a two-year old and a real life member of the “Trump bump,” the phenomenon legal scholars have been musing about since the president’s travel bans were rejected by courts early in the year.

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Is the California Bar Exam really that hard?

California has always had a reputation for having a very tough bar exam, perhaps going beyond a test of minimal competence. In fact, the passage rates on the California bar are so low that now it seems that the cut-off score for passing the bar in California will be lowered by the Supreme Court of California (the legal profession in each state is regulated by that state’s highest court) sometime in the fall or winter. What’s more, the new, lower cut-off will apply retroactively to people who fail the bar exam this July.

The reason for this score shakeup is that the California bar exam is too tough. Let’s see how tough it really is.

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Counterpoint: The New LSAT Schedule Is Trash

Yesterday, we talked about all the great benefits resulting from LSAC’s recent decision to offer two additional test dates per year. Today, I’m here to poop on everyone’s party. Here’s why you shouldn’t get too excited about having six chances to take the LSAT every year (aside from the obvious fact that no one gets too excited about taking the LSAT):

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Point: The New LSAT Schedule Is Pretty Good, For the Most Part

Last week, LSAC announced the LSAT is switching to a 6-test-a-year schedule. That means, in 2018, there will be an exam in June, September, and November and, in 2019, the exam will be administered in January, March, and early June. Now, my personal feelings aside, I’m going to talk about the potential benefits of this scheme.

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SCOTUS and the Travel Ban

Almost four months ago to the day, President Trump sent out the following tweet: “SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!” The emphatic message came on the heels of a Ninth Circuit decision refusing to enforce the first travel ban on individuals form seven enumerated countries. Though the President’s promise did not immediately come true—instead, the administration rolled out a second, updated travel ban—it appears that the next stop will indeed by the Supreme Court.