Category Archive: News

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Is the California Bar Exam really that hard?

California has always had a reputation for having a very tough bar exam, perhaps going beyond a test of minimal competence. In fact, the passage rates on the California bar are so low that now it seems that the cut-off score for passing the bar in California will be lowered by the Supreme Court of California (the legal profession in each state is regulated by that state’s highest court) sometime in the fall or winter. What’s more, the new, lower cut-off will apply retroactively to people who fail the bar exam this July.

The reason for this score shakeup is that the California bar exam is too tough. Let’s see how tough it really is.

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Counterpoint: The New LSAT Schedule Is Trash

Yesterday, we talked about all the great benefits resulting from LSAC’s recent decision to offer two additional test dates per year. Today, I’m here to poop on everyone’s party. Here’s why you shouldn’t get too excited about having six chances to take the LSAT every year (aside from the obvious fact that no one gets too excited about taking the LSAT):

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Point: The New LSAT Schedule Is Pretty Good, For the Most Part

Last week, LSAC announced the LSAT is switching to a 6-test-a-year schedule. That means, in 2018, there will be an exam in June, September, and November and, in 2019, the exam will be administered in January, March, and early June. Now, my personal feelings aside, I’m going to talk about the potential benefits of this scheme.

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SCOTUS and the Travel Ban

Almost four months ago to the day, President Trump sent out the following tweet: “SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!” The emphatic message came on the heels of a Ninth Circuit decision refusing to enforce the first travel ban on individuals form seven enumerated countries. Though the President’s promise did not immediately come true—instead, the administration rolled out a second, updated travel ban—it appears that the next stop will indeed by the Supreme Court.

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Before You Go Spouting Off About Free Speech, A Primer on the First Amendment

Gather ‘round folks, we’re about to learn a little free speech law. Very little.

UC Berkeley is having a tough time with student groups inviting speakers a majority of their students dislike. These incidents have provoked a lot of hot takes about the free speech and the First Amendment. So before you wage into your latest anonymous flame war on Twitter, Reddit, or Pinterest about this, let’s have a look at the law.

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The Lawyer’s Pursuit of “Truth”

We may be living in a “post-truth” society, but the truth made a strong comeback this weekend. Thousands of protesters marched Washington, D.C., and hundreds of other cities, to defend truth and facts. Specifically, the scientific method for discovering the truth, which protesters argue is under attack from a culture and—though the protests were billed as non-partisan, let’s face it—a presidential administration that value opinion and partisanship over facts and empirical evidence.

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The Fog of War Powers: Did Trump Have the Power to Authorize the Airstrike on Syria?

At the beginning of the week, it seemed like the biggest news would be the ongoing battle over whether the Senate would approve Neil Gorsuch’s appointment to the Supreme Court … aaaaand then came Thursday’s news that President Donald Trump authorized an airstrike against a Syrian air base.

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ISPs, the FCC, and the Stuff You Do on the Internet: A Rundown of Congress’ New Internet Privacy Law

Nowadays, people are willing to publicize a vast amount of private information. From locations and dates of birth to sexual orientation and relationship status, almost every aspect of a person’s life can often be found online with a few clicks. Yet, there is one area of our lives that we generally try to guard—our online search histories. I, for one, get a little nervous when someone asks to borrow my computer, just in case they open up my search history (not because there’s anything particular damning or deviant, I’m not that interesting).