Category Archive: Videos

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What’s the best major for the LSAT? (Video)

If you’ve done a little bit of nosing into the idea of going to law school – and chances are that, if you’re reading this blog right now (and you are reading this blog right now, just to be clear) you have – you’ve likely found out that there’s no required major or minor or even courses you must have taken to go to law school. Unlike med school where you need to do pre-med and take inscrutable things like organic chemistry and physiology, whatever those are, law schools’ mission is to take absolute beginners and turn them into lawyers in three years.

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How long do I study? (Video, babies, video.)

How should you spend your time? That’s a very broad question. All things being equal, we’d recommend putting in the 10,000 or so hours necessary to master the oboe. Oh, no oboe for you? Fair enough. Not many people drop by Most Strongly Supported to talk unpopular woodwind instruments.

No, instead, they drop by to talk about the LSAT and law school. Regarding the former concern, one of the most common questions we get is, “How long should I study for the LSAT?” Like most other things in life, there’s no one-size-fits-all-answer.

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YouTube Xmas Top Ten

We’ve already berated you (kindly) about studying over the Holidays. However, in this post – our last until Christmas is over – we’d like to give you an early present. Here’s a whole bunch of great videos to watch with the family this Christmas. What better gift could you have than an excuse to shush obnoxious family members – I’m lookin’ at you, Uncle Jeff! – for interrupting Christmas programming?

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Watch a Compilation of Fallacies From the 10/13 Democratic Debate

Check out Democratic Presidential candidates’ most memorable fallacious statements from October 13th’s Democratic Debate on CNN. Just so you know — These videos a part of our continuous series where we will analyze fallacies in both Republican and Democratic debates. For a detailed explanation about our methodologies, thought process, and fallacy definitions check out our

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Geraldo Rivera’s Questionable Reasoning in the Trayvon Martin Case

The much-publicized death of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin took an interesting twist when Geraldo Rivera pronounced in an interview on “Fox and Friends” last week that “I think the hoodie is as much responsible for Trayvon Martin‘s death as much as George Zimmerman was.” Later in the interview Rivera also said “Trayvon Martin, God bless him, an innocent kid, a wonderful kid, a box of Skittles in his hands. He didn’t deserve to die. But I bet you money, if he didn’t have that hoodie on, that nutty neighborhood watch guy wouldn’t have responded in that violent and aggressive way.”

Without commenting on the tragedy of Trayvon’s death or the hoodie movement it has spawned across the country and at institutions like Harvard Law School, we at Blueprint were interested in the outrageous errors in reasoning Rivera’s comments displayed. One of the few bright spots in studying for the LSAT is that, if done correctly, it trains you to spot fallacious reasoning. This comes in handy as a law student, a law practitioner, and, in this case, as a media consumer.

Perhaps the journalism standards for someone who hosted episodes such as “My Ex Hired a Hitman to Kill Me”

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Grand Prize Winner of the Blueprint Video Contest

Throughout June, while you were planning weddings, Vegas trips, and barbeques, Blueprint was holding a video contest to give away a free Blueprint LSAT course. Participants had to submit a video of no more than three (3) minutes that incorporated the words and/or visual representations “LSAT”, “Thurgood Marshall”, and “spatula.”

If you are the avid Blueprint groupie that we know you all are (please, just let us have this one fantasy), you may have seen all the videos on our Facebook page. Although all our submissions were awesome, as is typical of first prize winners, there can only be one (Ricky Bobby quote inserted here) and Daniel Spafford earned that title. His east coast swag and sick flow helped him rack up the most votes from viewers, and his passion for Blueprint (or the free course) swooned the judges (Matt thought it was pretty cool he was in his first rap video).