LSAT Score Predictor: Downton Abbey Edition

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Continuing our tradition of predicting the LSAT scores of fictional characters from television shows, this week we turn our sights across the pond to Yorkshire, England. Just how would the residents of Downton Abbey fare in the face of our favourite standardised teste?

Earl Robert Crawley – 164
Robert Crawley, the head of Downton Abbey, is a surprisingly rational and forward-thinking man, especially for an aristocrat. Whether allowing his daughter to marry a commoner or turning his home into an infirmary, he’s shown that he isn’t too proud a man, and would make sure to study diligently. But he also has a pretty fatalistic streak, which we witnessed when he wouldn’t fight for Mary’s right to be able to inherit the estate. So he wouldn’t retake the test even though he could probably do even better. He’d also probably have a sudden outburst about the need to leave things as they are.

Mary and Edith Crawley – Dismissed for Misconduct
Mary and Edith are both terrible people. Mary sabotaged Edith’s potential marriage in just about the bitchiest way possible. And that was mostly to get back at Edith, who tattled on Mary for screwing a man to death. I think everyone would be pretty happy if they both died in riding accidents or something equally stupid. As for their LSAT scores, they haven’t done a lot to show that they have much intelligence to them, and there’s probably a lot of inbreeding on their dad’s side to boot. What would end up happening, though, is that they’d both try to cheat, possibly off each other. But they’d do so terribly, and would get caught and kicked out of the test. Claiming they never wanted to take the test in the first place, they’d go back to staring out windows for extended periods of time.

Daisy – 120
Daisy, Downton’s timid scullery maid, doesn’t have much in the way of intellectual strength or just general willpower, but deep down she is a good person. Unfortunately, deep down she’s also really, really dumb. It’s questionable if she’s even literate. The only thing Daisy would get right on her Scantron would be her name, and even that’s a bit of a stretch. She’d probably cry about it, but then get distracted by a butterfly or something.

Sybil Branson – 173
The youngest Crawley sister would also be the one to have the most success on the test. We already know that she’s the Abbey’s most political and civically minded resident, so Sybil would be the most likely to want to get a legal degree in the first place. And being married and pregnant certainly wouldn’t keep her at home. Who knows, perhaps she would end up being the first female barrister in Britain, opening her own practice where she could spend her days purposefully staring out windows.

Gwen Dawson – 169
Gwen would be one of the only ones to actually study a lot, and would wind up doing very well (but only after much coaching from her study-partner, Sybil). People would fondly remember her as “Who? That maid with the typewriter? Oh yeah. Whatever happened to her?” Well, what happened to her is that she went to law school. Or to be a secretary. Who cares? She’s probably dead.

Violet Crawley – Withdrawal
We already know that Violet thinks being a lawyer (like being a doctor) is a lowly profession, so there’s pretty much no way she would take the test. She’d be too busy to be a lawyer anyway, as it would conflict with her busy schedule of running Gryffindor House and reluctantly putting on concerts for the Pope.

Matthew Crawley – 158
Matthew actually is already a lawyer (a solicitor, specifically) and would thus be the only person realistically to have taken the LSAT. Except that the LSAT didn’t exist until the 1940s. And the British legal education system is totally different from America’s, not requiring the LSAT. This all sort of breaks down under any sort of scrutiny. So let’s just say 158, because, hey, why not.

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