5 Dos and Don’ts with Two-and-a-Half Weeks Until the LSAT

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There are two-and-a-half weeks left until the June LSAT, but who’s counting? No doubt your emotions are starting to run high—be they excitement, anxiety, guilt, optimism, or some good old-fashioned paranoia. You’re probably going back and forth between daydreams of scoring a personal best LSAT score and nightmares of forgetting how to write your own name on a Scantron. The following advice will hopefully allow you to increase your LSAT score by a couple of precious points or, at the very least, avoid an infamous LSAT test day meltdown.

DOs:

• There’s still time to achieve some solid LSAT studying. Iron out any wrinkles you may have — whether they’re LSAT logic games, Logical Reasoning flaw questions, or LSAT reading comp passages. Focus on the area that you are struggling on the most and do some complete timed sections, then make sure to thoroughly review all the questions you got wrong.

• Check out the LSAT testing center where you’ll be taking the June LSAT, especially if you are unfamiliar with the campus or don’t know exactly how long it takes to get there. These steps will ease any unnecessary anxieties on LSAT test day.

• Get lots of sleep. It’s common to be restless the night before the LSAT, but as long as you’ve had a good amount of sleep in the days leading up to the exam, you’ll be just fine come LSAT test time. Along with drinking lots of water and taking your vitamin C, ample sleep could also prevent you from getting sick, so take a leaf out of Mom’s book and get to bed early over the next couple of weeks.

DON’Ts:

• Don’t plan to spend the last couple of days leading up to the June LSAT on intensive cramming. The 48 hours before taking the LSAT shouldn’t be reserved for doing all the homework you skipped in lessons 2-10, nor should the time be used to cram in those last two LSAT practice tests you bought for 20 bucks apiece from that shady website. The days immediately preceding the LSAT should be reserved for relaxing; feel free to even take a much needed shower.

• Don’t start taking Adderall or caffeine supplements if you haven’t already been doing so. Taking amphetamines for the first time the morning of LSAT test day isn’t going to turn you into Einstein; it’s more likely going to turn you into an anxious wreck, with a heartbeat faster than Usain Bolt.

In the words of Psycho Mike, in this crazy mixed-up world that makes you think that nobody cares, remember, we do. Be good.

2 Responses

  1. Taylor says:

    Do you have any advice on a morning-of schedule? I’m generally an early riser (between 6 and 7) and have been having trouble getting into a rhythm of being my most alert at 1pm (usually I’m ready for an afternoon nap by then!). Should I be training myself to wake up and begin my day a bit later? I’d appreciate any suggestions… thanks!

  2. AnonLsat says:

    Yeah so I have been taking addys and yes it helped me figure out the most important thing ever: STOP SMOKING POT…and get a higher score on the LSAT!!! Lol my test is in feb….I am stopping the addys now cus they make me crazy, I did figure out the trick to the test thanks to it though through practice, now I am just going to go head on without it three weeks until test day! Wish me luck!

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