December 2010 LSAT Scores Released

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December 2010 LSAT Scores Released
December LSAT scores are out.

Pause here for intense emotion, followed by ferraro rocher consumption (don’t act like you haven’t tried its sweet, sweet combination of nougat and chocolate crispies). After the tumult of receiving your LSAT score has subsided, it’s time to turn your attention to the question of a most urgent nature. Namely, how difficult was the curve for the December 2010 LSAT?

In early December, our very own Blueprint LSAT founder Matt Riley made some predictions about the December 2010 curve. The upshot? That it would easier than winning a limbo showdown with Yao Ming. Since Yao Ming is 7’6”, that’s pretty darn easy.

Turns out he was right. Like, really really right. Out of 102 questions (the first time in 18 years that the test had this many questions)*, you could miss 14 for a 170, 22 for a 165, and 30 for a 160.**

That’s INSANE. To put it in perspective, in December of 2005 you could miss eight questions for a 170. Here, you could miss fourteen. Fourteen, people! If I had taken the December 2005 LSAT, I would track everyone down via stalker, I mean twitter, and peg them with leftover fruitcake.

The bad news is that this sucks for me because now I owe Mr. Riley a case of beer for getting his score prediction correct. The good news is that it’s going to be Schlitz. (And of course that lenient of a curve means it’s easier for all of you to get a higher score – hooorah).

So congratulations to all who took the December 2010. If you didn’t get the score you wanted, I wouldn’t blame it on the curve, because this baby was a New Year’s gift we might never see again.

Check out our discussion board for more conversation about the test and curve.

*Thanks, twitter peeps, for pointing this out – I incorrectly said it was the first time in my initial article.
**These are numbers reported from multiple students. An official copy of the curve has not yet been made available from LSAC.

4 Responses

  1. Wild Bill says:

    Do you have any read on how large the pool of test takers was this time around? I am assuming it was pretty large compared to past December tests because of the curve, but I was figuring if you had any details regarding that. I have already applied and I am just trying to get a feel for how large the applicant pool will be compared to last year. I figure a slight bit smaller, but not much. Thanks a bunch.

  2. Jodi Triplett says:

    Hey Wild Bill,
    We won’t know for sure until LSAC releases the figures, but June 2010 was the largest administration of June test takers, ever and October 2010 was the second highest administration of October test takers, ever. (I wrote a post on this, here: http://moststronglysupported.com/blog/lsat-analysis/the-alarming-number-of-october-2010-lsat-takers/)

    So fallaciously projecting this boom into the future, I surmise that the December test-taking population should be larger, not smaller. December 2010 had 171,514 test takers, so perhaps 180,000? It’s hard to know.

    You should also keep in mind that just because people take the LSAT doesn’t mean they’re applying to law school. Particularly in a recession, you may get dabblers who are thinking about law school enough to take the test but aren’t serious enough to submit applications.

    Good luck!
    JT

  3. Wild Bill says:

    Thanks for the quick response Jodi. Part of the reason for my asking is that I can tell that many law schools were waiting to see how large the December pool would be before making final determinations on October and November RD applicants. Hence, just trying to get a feel for whether the next couple days will be wildly fantastic, horrible, or the more likely somewhere in between. =D Thanks again.

  4. JT says:

    I think there are probably more candidates for law schools overall but that not all of them are highly competitive.

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