Dumb Daylight Savings and How it Relates to the LSAT

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The Daylight Savings Time switch is this weekend! Exciting, right? We’re on the “spring forward” side of things, so at 2 a.m. on Sunday clocks move forward one hour. What does this mean for you? Well, it means that the clock has moved forward an hour, obviously. The sun rises later! The sun sets later! You get one hour less sleep! You forget about it 24 hours later! What a glorious invention Daylight Savings Time is.

If Daylight Savings seems pretty stupid, it’s because it is. It was originally implemented to save electricity, but there are now studies that suggest that it actually causes us to use more energy. DST ruining everything is far from a new phenomenon. The seeds for the idea were planted by none other than Ben Franklin, a man famous for his love of prostitutes and failing to ever be president. True DST wasn’t proposed until the late 19th century by a Kiwi named George Vernon Hudson (once again proving that nothing good ever comes out of New Zealand). But it wasn’t actually implemented until World War I, when Germany set their ever-precise clocks to DST (proving that Daylight Savings paved the way for the Nazis). Now daylight savings just exists to make you late for important things and to fill up blog topics.

Some other fun daylight savings facts:

Arizona doesn’t observe DST, although the Navajo Indian Reservation, which is partially in the state, does.

There are places, such as Iceland, that have permanent daylight savings time – the sun just always sets later. Apparently this isn’t used worldwide because it makes too much sense.

Venezuela doesn’t have DST per se, but in 2007 they moved their clocks back by half an hour to have more daylight. This is largely because the super-rational Hugo Chavez doesn’t want the country to share its time with good old America. One of the only other areas to be half an hour off is Newfoundland, Canada’s famously worst province.

And what does this all mean for the LSAT? Later sunsets leads to more time studying inside when you’d rather be out in the nice weather. Now that spring’s right around the corner, studying for the LSAT is going to become even more torturous. But fight the urge for daylight! Keep your eye on the prize, because once you’ve taken the LSAT it’s off to law school, where you’ll have all the free time you could ever need!

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