Four Common Characteristics of an LSAT Veteran

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Veterans Day was yesterday, and people all over the country took the time to honor those who have served. We shouldn’t forget that servicemen and women are the real heroes, and they really do put our own LSAT prep concerns into perspective. We may already know what the characteristics of actual military veterans are, but what makes an LSAT veteran?

Characteristic I of an LSAT Veteran: Increased (Mental) Strength

When you first start studying for the LSAT, the subject matter can seem pretty pointless and arbitrary. But what LSAT veterans often notice is that the skills that they learned for the test are not only retained, but also useful. It’s easier to spot bad arguments in everyday life, and your general level of comprehension is higher when encountering dense texts. Games might not help quite as much, but if you ever find the need to put a bunch of differently colored cars in a parking lot, you’ll be all set.

Characteristic II of an LSAT Veteran: Better Sense of Timing

You can only do so many timed 35-minute sections before you gain something of an internal chronometer. No matter what an LSAT veteran is doing, without even thinking about it, he or she will feel a jolt after doing anything continuously for 2,100 seconds pass.

Characteristic III of an LSAT Veteran: Poor Eyesight

This is one of the less desirable side effects. LSAT veterans spend hours upon hours reading small print in dark rooms, so their eyesight sometimes suffers. In addition, recent LSAT veterans might at first experience an aversion of sunlight, as their prolonged absence from the outdoors makes them both confused by and fearful of the daylight.

Characteristic IV of an LSAT Veteran: Irrational Fear of Wooden Pencils

Rarely do you find an LSAT veteran who uses anything but a good, sturdy pen. Upon seeing a wooden No. 2 pencil, it’s not uncommon for those of us who have taken the LSAT to involuntarily be overcome with a sense of dread. If you have an LSAT veteran in your life, make sure to remove all wooden #2 pencils from the area to prevent the recurrence of any unwanted memories. Also, you should do this just because wooden pencils are stupid and we’re not living in the 19th century.

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