The Morning Cometh: The February 2017 LSAT

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No doubt, you passed out immediately after the LSAT last night, and did not devote a moment’s thought to it today as you watched the game that comes around very year: The Superb Owl game.

Spoiler alert: God is a Patriots fan.

Now, we’re talking February LSAT. As we’ve explained before, the February LSAT is a weirdo. Super early for admission the following you, super late for admission the same year. And, of course, the questions will never be released.

If you didn’t take yesterday’s exam but are instead studying for June or beyond, hopefully this post will give you a small window into trends that may impact your exam.

So let’s do this:

First, if the addled test takers are reporting correctly, this was a 102 question test. Usually, the test is 101, and sometimes 100. Yeesh.

Second, there kinda is no second. While some of the games seemed to be difficult, including what may have been ordering with 12 slots, there was nothing shockingly abnormal. And games, for the past few exams, have been a roller coaster ride for students.

Now…

Logic Games

As mentioned above, games have been a hairy ride recently. In December, there was the trading buildings game, which was a Pattern game, which had been rare in years past. There was the computer virus game from September, which was weird Ordering game. The June exam had a game about the selection of offices, which was another Pattern game.

This time, however, it seems from our sources that all of the games fell were Ordering and/or Grouping. Please give more detail below if you know regarding classification.

Reading Comprehension

The makers of the LSAT are so hard up for ideas that they have now done two passages on the dance honeybees do in their hives. Phonin’ it in, guys.

Again, not any complaints that any of this was too abstract or difficult. Maybe the complaints will come through the door once people have slept off the beer and Jell-o shots.

Logical Reasonings

Getting a handle on Logical Reasoning is always the toughest task when we review an LSAT on The Morning Cometh. That makes sense because there are about fifty questions — half the scored questions, as you likely know — all unrelated.

For a rundown of the LR questions that stuck out, checkout the LSAT subreddit. All in all, it seems that LR wasn’t out of control, although there are always a few bad apples that spoil the bunch.

So what now?

Here’s where we toss at you our perennial favorite video, “Should I Cancel My LSAT Score?” This soon after a possibly traumatizing experience, you may not want to watch, and you don’t have to. Yet.

The official cancellation policy is here. In brief, you have until 11:59 pm Eastern on the sixth day after the exam to cancel. So, relax today. Think it through. Then decide whether to cancel. Obviously, determining which section you took was the Experimental Section is very important in knowing whether to cancel.

(As an aside, if you’re wondering about the LSAT curve, it’s not really a curve, but you can read all about it here.)

Got any additional info/feelings on the exam? Drop a comment!

3 Responses

  1. John Doe says:

    I might it might have been 103 questions, but not sure. One LG had 26, and the other 27. I’m guessing the RC and AR stayed the same, but I don’t recall.

  2. John Doe says:

    Regarding the games. The first game was a pure sequencing game. It had the typical “or” rule (e.g. z can’t be between x and y (so either both before or after)). For another one of the games, you had 6 total variables. If I remember correctly, it was 2 teapots, 2 cups, and 2 vases, one gold and one silver, and they had to be grouped into three slots. This game contained your normal “not” rules (e.g. No teacups in slot 1, no gold in the third slot,…).

  3. John Doe says:

    In the second RC section, the test makers played a good psychological trick on us that I see quite often. The third passage was a very difficult one to fully comprehend, but the passage right after that was extremely easy. Unfortunately, I fell for their trap. I spent a lot of time trying to understand the passage, by the time I did I had less than five minutes left and wasn’t able to finish all the questions for the easy passage. Lesson learned.

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