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The Deal With That Trading Buildings Game

It’s rare in this world to find something that everyone can agree upon. In the hours after the December 2016 LSAT, however, we found something that fits the bill: the Logic Game about companies trading buildings was all kinds of f***ed up. Well, last week, as happens every year this time, the exam was released. And, of course, we got our grubby little hands on it immediately to take a gander at this oddity. To be sure, this game was weird.

Logical Reasonings / 1.10.17

A. The Academic Dean at Charlotte Law School — which we will refer to as Charlotte “Law School” henceforth — has been forced out. She’ll probably be replaced by a Big Mac or a dustpan or something. The Charlotte Observer

B. People are taking action against sites like Breitbart News by taking screenshots of ads next to offensive content and posting them on social media, an attempt to shame advertisers into withholding ad dollars from the site. The latest example? UC Hastings School of Law. Above the Law

C. Fox News has settled a lawsuit with a former anchor who accused Bill O’Reilly of sexual harassment. New York Daily News

D. Trump’s controversial pick for Attorney General is being grilled in a confirmation hearing today. Politico

E. Does the battery on your new MacBook Pro run out of juice in the blink of an eye. Consumer Reports is on the case. Mac Rumors

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Amazon Echo and the Fourth Amendment

Our generation is used to giving up control over vast amounts of personal information. From Facebook check-ins to cell site location information, the police have readily ascertainable digital footprints to track virtually all of our movements. The question, which the Supreme Court will likely have to address going forward, is how much digital information can be presented in court without violating either the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable searches.

Logical Reasonings / 1.9.17

A. The administration of Charlotte Law School is just the worst. The worst! Above the Law

B. Got your little lawyery heart set on a judicial clerkship? These schools ought to be on your radar. US News & World Report

C. What on earth? Chipotle used this a photo of a woman dining at one of their restaurants in 2006 in three restaurants without her permission. She’s suing. Sounds reasonable, right? She’s asking for over $2 billion. Get a life, lady! Eater

D. Meryl Streep lays into Donald Trump at the Golden Globes and — surprise, surprise — Trump has a Twitter freakout about it. CNN

E. Suspects have been arrested in the Paris holdup of Kim Kardashian West late last year. NPR

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The Makers of the LSAT Are Playing (Logic) Games With Your Head

There have been some weird logic games lately. For a very long time, from the late 1990s until a few years ago, it seemed as if logic games had standardized. The vast majority of logic games asked you to put things in order, in groups, or both. The exact kind of ordering or grouping varied from test to test, but relatively standard games dominated.

Sure, there were hard games. Every test has one. Some games were weird. But back then, most of the weird games were recognizable as tricky variations of normal games, with many of the same kinds of rules.