Tag Archive: admissions

BPPshinners-lsat-blog-new-harvard-law-school-admissions-program
/ / /

HLS v. LSAC

Important news for people who hate the LSAT: Harvard Law School just announced that it will begin considering GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores.

For the uninitiated, the GRE — Graduate Records Exam — is the standardized test that students headed for graduate school usually take. This is true for math majors and English majors alike. As you might have guessed from that brief list, the test is a broad survey of the skills necessary — or at least helpful — for school in general: verbal/written skills and quantitative skills. Missing from the GRE is the logic and argumentation bent of the LSAT.

BPPaaron-lsat-blog-waitlisted-june-lsat-test-center
/

Waitlisted? Do something about it.

The law school application cycle rolls on, and that means that in addition to receiving a lot of acceptances (hopefully), you may also start receiving some not-so-good news. Being placed on a school’s waitlist can be discouraging, but the good news is that being waitlisted for a law school is not a kiss of death, the way it often is for undergrad admissions – schools only waitlist candidates they’d seriously consider, and people are accepted into law schools from the waitlist with some regularity. In the meantime, here are some things you can do to improve your chances:

aaron-lsat-blog-good-time-apply-law-school
/ /

How law school got its groove back. Or didn’t.

Did you hear that applications to Hofstra University’s law school have nearly doubled in a year? No? Well, it’s true. Of course, it’s fallacious to assume that one law school on Long Island is representative of what’s happening in general — I’d argue it’s generally a bad idea to extrapolate from Long Island to the

BPPshinners-lsat-blog-lsac-latest-data-takeaways
/ /

LSAT numbers tick up. Will applications follow?

The number of LSAT takers took a nosedive in 2010, and continued to slide through 2015. While still far off their 2009 high, the number has definitely stabilized — also known as “hitting rock bottom” in famous musician parlance. The 2015-2016 LSAT year (June ’15, Sept/Oct ’15, Dec ’15, February ’16) saw year-over-year increases averaging a little less than 5%. 2016-2017 started off flat, with June drop of about 1% and a Sept/Oct jump of about 1%.

BPPlaura-lsat-blog-dumpster-fire
/

There are law schools you shouldn’t go to.

Last week, the Department of Education flagged five law schools for failing to meet its gainful employment standard, a measure of graduates’ debt-to-income ratios. If the law schools in the hot seat fail the standard again next year, their students will no longer be eligible for federal student aid.

BPProbert-lsat-blog-choose-law-school
/ /

As Enrollments Remain Low, At Least One Law School Is Closing Its Doors.

There are too many law schools in the USofA today. They are taking too many students, and charging too much money, to too many people who will never be able to payoff their law school debt with money earned in the legal profession. In the wake of the White House’s crackdown on for-profit colleges, I’m curious to see if we might see the discussion turn towards law schools in the near future.

BPPyuko-lsat-blog-internships
/ /

The 5 Things Prospective Law Students Don’t Do But Absolutely Should

Law school is not just a big investment of time and money, it’s a life-shaping experience. To ensure that experience is positive and healthy, there are a few things that any prospective law student should do. There is some overlap between each of these, but that’s to be expected.

BPProbert-lsat-blog-one-month
/

From the Vaults: A Brief Rundown of the Law School Admissions Timeline

“Tick-tock,” says the applications timeline clock. “Stop ticking,” says the law school applicant.

Today’s post is a rundown of when you should be doing what when it comes to applying for law school starting in Fall of 2017. (If you’re looking to start this coming Fall and have yet to get the ball rolling, this post is also for you, because you’re too late, bucko, and it’s Fall 2017 for you, also.)

BPPlaura-lsat-blog-tutoring-sale
/ / /

Hey, Blueprint! What LSAT score do I need?

The LSAT, as you may know, is not a pass/fail exam. Rather, it’s based on a scale of 120 to 180. If you get a 120, you won’t be going to law school, and, if you get a 180, you pretty much have your pick of schools to go to. Not surprisingly, most people don’t get within 10 points of either extreme. Very often I get the question from a student, “What LSAT score do I need?” Well, that depends on a few things. So, let me ask you a few questions, and maybe we can figure it out together.