Tag Archive: admissions

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BREAKING NEWS: The American Bar Association adds a fourth year to law school

Responding to growing, twin crises in the legal field, the American Bar Association announced on Friday that all accredited law schools must provide their students four years of instruction, rather than the traditional three. To make matters worse, the ABA announced that the requirement applies to anyone who has yet to complete law school. 3L’s at law schools across the nation, many of whom had already secured bar study loans and lined up jobs, will be forced to put off those plans for a year, and put themselves substantially in debt.

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Law School Transfer: Solid Plan or Utter Fantasy?

Much like college applications, there are reach, match, and safety schools when applying for law school, and for a lot of people, there’s that one dream school. Things might not work out as planned, though — whether because of a low LSAT, GPA, or some other reason — and you might not get into your dream school. When that happens, some people choose to go to a lesser school than their dream school, while planning to transfer later, and the intake numbers at higher-ranked schools reflect this.

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Now’s the time.

The results are in, and, for the second time in a row, the number of LSAT takers year-over-year is emphatically up. For the June 2015 exam, the number of test takers was up 6.6% over June 2014, and for the September/October 2015 exam, the number of test takers was up 7.4% over September/October 2014. This comes after a string of drops, often in the double-digits, between 2010 and 2014.

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Logical Reasonings / 6.10.15

A) Check out this updated 2014-2015 law school admissions data by region, demographic and – most interesting – LSAT score. Spivey Consulting

B) One law school is allegedly paying low-performing students to skip the bar exam (and improve the school’s bar passage statistics). Yikes. Above the Law

C) Talk to law profs and current students to learn more about your law school options. U.S. News and World Report

D) A talk with one of New York’s few remaining courtroom artists. Wall Street Journal

E) Here’s how Clickhole became the best website on the internet. Slate

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This Week’s Best Pre-Law Links

The internet is like the Grand Canyon: massive, awe-inspiring, occasionally shitty, and impossible to see the whole thing. To help out with that last one, I’ve collected some of my favorite pre-law related stories from the past couple weeks for your edification. Don’t say I never did anything for you.

The Smartest People Are Opting Out of Law School
There are two ways to look at this article. One is that all the smarties have realized that law school does not guarantee a six-figure income like we once thought, and have decided to pursue a more certain career path, like engineering or grave-digging. The other is that a good LSAT score is worth more now that it ever has been. If you want to be a lawyer and you can ace the test, you’ll have your pick of schools and scholarships, and will be able to set yourself up for better opportunities than you ever could have during the law school boom of the early aughts.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.2.15

A) More wise words on the necessity of negotiating your scholarship award. PreLaw Magazine

B) It may be 40 years old, but The Paper Chase is still a realistic look at law school. Above the Law

C) If you’re still waiting on law school admissions, it might be best to just kick back and relax. Ms. JD

D) For the first time in U.S. history, a woman has been convicted of feticide. Washington Post

E) A man who hates April Fools live-blogged April Fools and it’s glorious. The Guardian

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Faith and the Law School Admission Process

Today’s post comes to us from Ann Levine, a law school admissions consultant and the founder of LawSchoolExpert.com. She is the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert.

No, this post isn’t about having “faith” that you will get into the law school you desire. I want to talk about sharing religious involvement in your law school application. Blueprint asked me to answer a question for a blog reader:

Will the faith-based volunteer work on my resume be frowned upon or looked at differently than non-religious experiences?

I really love this question, because the applicant assumes she will share that her work was, in fact, religious in nature.

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Logical Reasonings / 3.10.15

A) Predicting the 2015-2016 law school admissions cycle. Spoiler: It’s just like Back to the Future 2. Spivey Consulting

B) Reps from Above the Law, Law School Transparency and LSAT Blog talk (argue) about the law schools that are dropping their LSAT requirement. HuffPost Live

C) Track how much law school tuition has increased over time using this nifty tool. Then dry your tears with a nifty Kleenex. Bar Exam Stats

D) Lego Supreme Court Justices. ‘Nuff said. Maiaw

E) Check out this painting of London by a 19th century Japanese artist who had never visited. Slate

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To Gap Year or Not To Gap Year?

I graduated from my undergrad in 2010. It took me four years to make my way to law school. I wrote about how I decided to go to law school before, but today I bring you my take on the gap year(s).

Generally, I think it’s a great idea to take a year off. Once you start law school you’ll never have the chance to take a “gap” year again, unless something goes horribly wrong. Law school is a lot of work, and so is being a lawyer. Taking some time off can also help you work harder once you get to law school without burning out.

If you’re only going to take one year off in between your undergrad and law school, you don’t really have to do anything special.