Tag Archive: advice

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My 99th Percentile LSAT Score Story: Robert Seaney

Definitely came out of my diagnostic exam, my first ever run through the LSAT, whining – and I quote – “I’ll never get Logic Games – there’s just too many moving pieces!”

While I maintain that I’m right about the second part, I couldn’t have been more wrong about the first.

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The flawless LSAT taker knows her flaws.

Flaw questions on the LSAT are many things, but unpredictable they ain’t – LSAC loves to use variations on the same flaw, over and over. (That’s one of the reasons why the LSAT is such a learnable test.) Obviously, in order to effectively tackle Flaw questions on the LSAT, you should have a good understanding of the flaws themselves. However, it’s also very helpful to know things that are very rarely flaws – things that show up frequently as an answer choice, but are almost never the correct answer.

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Quantify this!

Quantifiers. Some LSAT students think they’re the enemy. Blueprint classes cover quantifiers (some, most, all, and the valid inferences that can be drawn from those claims) in lesson 3 and it’s a lot of new material at once. It can be scary. But it’s worth getting it down. You’re likely to see quantifiers on a small handful of questions on the LSAT. Having quantifiers down can keep those questions from tying your brain in knots. If you have to figure them out on the spot, it’s not easy. If you know what you need to know, it makes things much more straightforward.


My 99th Percentile LSAT Score Story: Philip Mayer

I don’t like standardized tests. I hated studying for the SAT, the ACT, and the slew of other exams I had to slog my way through. This comic perfectly encapsulates my feelings toward standardized testing—certain people are better suited for the way of thinking that it takes to succeed, through no fault of their own. When it came to the LSAT, I started out nearer the monkey in the comic (definitely not the bird) than the fish…or seal.

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September LSAT: The Morning Cometh

Ohhhh… poor baby. Your eyes are all bloodshot. Don’t get up yet. Here’s a glass of ice-cold water and some Advil. Go ahead, drink it down. I’ll wait, because I’m so proud of you my smart little LSAT taker, although you really let loose last night after the exam. In case you’re wondering, those new pants aren’t salvageable.


The Perfect LSAT Snack

LSAT test day is almost upon us, and it’s time to turn your thoughts to the single most important part of the LSAT, something you’ve been practicing for your whole life. That’s right – it’s finally time to discuss the snack.
For all that LSAC gives exhaustive guidelines about what can and cannot be in your gallon-sized Ziploc bag (Erasers? Sure! Erasers with sleeves? No way!), they don’t have much to say on the subject of your mid-test snack. Your beverage has to be in a plastic container or juice box and can’t be bigger than 20 ounces (so kiss that can of Red Bull goodbye), but that’s about all the guidance you get.

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The 5 Things Prospective Law Students Don’t Do But Absolutely Should

Law school is not just a big investment of time and money, it’s a life-shaping experience. To ensure that experience is positive and healthy, there are a few things that any prospective law student should do. There is some overlap between each of these, but that’s to be expected.

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With Logic Games, a little time on the front-end pays off on the score report.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve found yourself scrambling to get an assignment done the night before it is due. Among those nights of panic and regret, you’ve probably also encountered the stomach churning realization that you’re not going to be able to complete your task on time. When I’ve been in those moments of desperate clarity, I’ve promised myself time and time again that I won’t procrastinate ever again–I’ll turn over a new leaf and stay ahead of my work. And yet, I keep finding myself in the same situation over and over again.