Tag Archive: advice

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LSAT Reading Comprehension: It Ain’t What You Think

It’s just words, right? WRONG. If you’re planning to take the LSAT, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve taken other standardized tests before — the SAT or ACT, perhaps even the GRE or GMAT. These tests all have one thing in common: reading comprehension. On the surface, all reading comp looks pretty similar. There’s a

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The LSAT Writing Sample: What and Why

When I took the LSAT back in 10,000 BC, there was no writing sample. Just five sections of multiple choice fun, and then it was off to drink whiskey until my results came three weeks later. (Okay, I did things besides drink whiskey, but the evening after the LSAT was all whiskey.) Now, and since 2007, there is a sixth, written section to the LSAT.

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You Got This!

Well, this is it. After months of preparation, the day of reckoning – the December LSAT test day – is here.

Do you feel ready? No? That’s fine – in fact, that’s normal. No matter how long you’ve been studying, there will always be something else that you could’ve studied if you had just a little more time. But even if you don’t feel ready, you are.

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The Perfect Snack for The December 2016 LSAT

We all know the most important part of the LSAT is your test day snack. It almost goes without saying. This post is going to cover the best, and worst, snack day options. Believe me, not all snacks are created equal — this is serious business.

First, let’s talk about some snacks that you should definitely not bring to the LSAT. I would recommend against bringing Red Bull, Five Hour Energy, or any other energy drink unless you are very used to taking practice tests with the jolt of liquid courage such beverages provide.

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Personal Statement Myths, Debunked

There are some prevalent myths about what a winning personal statement must look like. Aspiring law school students often do themselves a disservice by adhering to these myths. It’s not just that buying into them is not helpful; buying into them may turn an otherwise solid effort into something that makes admissions committee members groan and roll their eyes. That’s not a recipe for success. So, let’s take a look at just two of these myths and see how you can avoid them.

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The December LSAT is upon us.

If you’re registered for the December LSAT, I’m sure I don’t need to remind you that test day is fast approaching. By this point, you should be about done learning new material and shifting fully into practice mode. We’ve discussed how to spend your time during these critical final weeks, but here are some pointers to keep in mind for your mental health:

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The Deal With Weaken Questions

What does it mean to weaken an argument? A lot of tough weaken questions will be much easier if we clarify what, exactly, it takes. Let’s start off with an argument.

Randy is planning on asking Sandy out next week. Randy has a luscious, flowing mullet (the hairstyle, not the fish). Therefore, Sandy will almost certainly say yes.