Tag Archive: Application

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Apply to Law School with a Poor LSAT Score or Wait Until the Next Exam?

So you didn’t get the score you wanted on the September LSAT, and you’re planning on retaking in December in the hope of improving your score.  You and lots and lots of other people! What’s the best move for your application timeline?  Should you submit now with your existing score, or hold off until you have your December score?

I recommend submitting your applications with your September score, even if you think you’ll be retaking the test. You could always hold off on submitting until the December score comes in, or you could submit with September but ask the schools to hold off on reviewing your file until then (which is effectively the same as not submitting until the score arrives).

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Logical Reasonings / 10.7.14

We give some advice on making time for your LSAT studies over at Pre Law Guru.

4 ways to beat law school application stress. I only need two: Water. Slides. The Girls Guide to Law School

How being a law student and a functional human don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Law School Toolbox

Airbnb is in a legal battle. Does anyone have a good lawyer crashing on their couch? Wall Street Journal

This spider is a genius and must be destroyed. io9

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Admissions Consultant: Starting Your Law School Applications

Today’s tips come from Eileen Conner, who helps law students create excellent law school admissions essays in her work as founder of Pen and Chisel.

The LSAT is finally over! After several months of serious study, you’ve successfully leaped the first major hurdle in your journey toward a completed law school application. Congratulations!

But the LSAT is not the only obstacle that stands between you and a completed law school application. What should you do next to ensure that you finish a strong, persuasive application by the time your deadlines come knocking?

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Out After Curfew: Do You Have to Disclose?

Disclosure is an extremely common issue that many students deal with in law school applications, and this question comes from right here at Most Strongly Supported:

Three days before my 18th birthday, I was caught being out at night after curfew. There was no drinking or anything like it involved. The police made me wait for my parents to come get me, same with my friends.

The told me they were giving me a warning, but I never received any type of documentation so was led to believe it was verbal. I was also under the impression that since I was turning 18 in three days, that warning would be taken from my record anyway. Is this something that needs to be disclosed [on my law school applications]? And how do I find out if it was actually a written warning?

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3 Ways To Make Your Law School Application Stand Out

Every outstanding law school application package has a common quality: extreme thoughtfulness. Nothing is submitted haphazardly – everything has a purpose, and everything adds something new to the law school admission committee’s understanding of your experiences and perspective.

Here are three places where you can concentrate your efforts:

1. The law school personal statement is your best opportunity to shine. It allows you to add context to your experiences, to draw a thread through your activities and decisions, and to show growth and focus. This is your best possible interview because you get to pick each word in advance – what an opportunity!

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Logical Reasonings / 7.30.12

A) Plummeting application numbers means law schools aren’t afraid to give out scholarships. Wall Street Journal.

B) If you’re still waitlisted at a law school, here are a few answers to questions you may have. Law Admissions Lowdown.

C) One of the American fencing coaches in this year’s Olympics almost went to law school instead. Star Tribune.

D) No matter how upset you are about NBC’s delayed airings of the Olympic events, Nic Cage is more pissed. Tech Crunch.

E) Finally, an answer to the Westboro Baptist Church protesters. Zombies? Huffington Post.

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Law School Admissions: The Waitlist vs. the Hold

So your applications have all been sent out. Now it’s time to wait.

And wait.

And wait.

Since you’re a potential law student, and as a group they’re not known for letting things go, you’re probably obsessing over every website and friend that might hold any information about when a decision is coming your way.

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Letters of Recommendation and How to Get Them

“You’re so beautiful, you could be a part-time model.”

That’s Jemaine from Flight of the Conchords, making up an awesome song that he thinks is actually paying a great compliment to a pretty girl he meets at a party. When I saw that episode recently, I thought of applications, because it’s a great example of damning with faint praise, one of the common things that can go wrong with recommendation letters.

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Sucky LSAT and GPA Numbers? Rethink Your Plans

Ann Levine of US News dropped anvils of knowledge on unsuspecting potential law students this week.

In her piece on the US News blog on Monday, Levine asked the question, “Can You Really Go to Law School?” and answered it with a resounding “Sort of, as long as you enjoy Puerto Rico.”

“Just wanting to go isn’t enough,” Levine writes. “Be honest with yourself. Do you really have a chance to get into the law schools you want, or even to get in anywhere?”

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The Weight of the Law School Waitlist

It’s the middle of March now, and among other things this signifies March Madness, a completely unnecessary and somewhat disastrous trip to Las Vegas on my part, and rapidly warming weather.  It also ushers in Part 2 of my discussion of waitlists. If you can cast your memory all the way back to late January, I posted about how to deal with getting put on a waitlist, and I promised that I would post about how to improve your chances for admission while waiting.

I sincerely hope that none of you were holding your breath.