Tag Archive: applying to law school

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What Majors Are Best for Law School?

Undergrads with dreams of eventually attending law school often wonder if there are certain majors that will better prepare you for law school (or that will make your application look better). I’ll go ahead and end the suspense now: There’s definitely no mandatory major if you plan to head to law school. With that said, you can definitely do some thinking and maneuvering to put you in the best position when it comes time for applications. Here’s some general tips and advice for when you’re deciding:

The most important thing is to do something that you know you’ll do well at. With law schools being a numbers-oriented business, that’s the most important piece of advice I can give.

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Early Bar Exam Results (And What They Mean for You)

Results are starting to trickle in from the July 2015 bar exam, and a first glance at the numbers shows that they’re not encouraging – the average score on the multiple-choice section of the exam has reached its lowest levels since 1988.

This news comes on the heels of last year’s results, when bar exam results had the single biggest drop since the bar exam started. Those results led to lots of finger-pointing – the National Conference of Bar Examiners stated that the people who took the July 2014 bar exam were “less able” than their predecessors. (More on that in a second.)

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LSAT Instructor: What I Learned in Law School Admissions

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He is starting at Columbia Law School this fall, and will be writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences. Here’s part one and part two.

After sending out applications to 15 law schools, I would like to share with you what I’ve learned about law school admissions.

But first, a disclaimer:

First, I’m extremely happy with and feel fortunate about my admissions outcomes. Second, these are just my own takeaways; your experiences or opinions might vary.

Lesson #1: You can get waitlisted/rejected even with great numbers.

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Another Slide: 2014 June LSAT Test-Takers Down 9.1%

The number of people taking the LSAT has dropped yet again.

If it seems like you’ve read that sentence before, it’s because you probably have. With the exception of a slight uptick in February 2014, the number of people taking the LSAT has steadily declined since October 2010. As I wrote when the December LSAT numbers were released, the decrease in people taking the LSAT is likely good news for people applying to law school now. Fewer people taking the LSAT means fewer law school applicants, which means less competition both for admittance and for scholarships. The good news, however, doesn’t stop there.

According to an article published in the Winter 2014 issue of PreLaw Magazine, though estimates of the exact time-frame vary, there could be more jobs than law school graduates as early as 2016.

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Logical Reasonings / 7.11.14

A) June LSAT test-takers were down 9.1% from last year. Law.com.

B) Law school enrollments are also down, but salaries are up. US News University Directory.

C) Non-traditional students shouldn’t have a tougher time applying to law school. Above the Law.

D) Any lawyers want to take on John Boehner’s suit against President Obama? Here’s his case. Vox.

E) Drones aren’t all bad. In fact, some take pretty rad photos. NPR.

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Talking Law School Personal Statements and Letters of Rec

Last week, Hank attended a handful of events at the 2014 Pacific Coast Association of Pre-Law Advisors (PCAPLA) Conference and blogged about them. This is part 2 of 3.

It might be a law school applicant’s market right now.

But you still have to make a compelling case.

That was the final message delivered by Golden Gate University School of Law Associate Dean of Admissions Angela Dalfen to close out the PCAPLA Conference discussion on personal statements and letters of recommendation last Friday at UCLA School of Law.

Dalfen, along with UCLA School of Law Director of Admissions Talin Broosan, discussed law school admissions essays and letters of rec for about an hour, passing along their best pieces of advice to the dozens of pre-law advisors from all over the country who were in attendance.

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The Importance of Diet and Exercise in Your LSAT Prep

For most people preparing to apply to law school, the LSAT is not their only responsibility. Many work full-time jobs or are still finishing their undergraduate degrees, among other activities. So with days that are already packed with to-dos, exercise and nutrition can easily get pushed to the bottom of the list.

And yet, our bodies are the vehicles through which we learn, experience emotions, and process stress, and few things (aside from sleep) could help us do that more successfully than fitness and a healthy diet.

This predicament is not unique to individuals. Many businesses find themselves in similar situations, in which the pressure to continue producing a high level of output delays needed improvements in infrastructure that could actually maximize efficiency, reduce expenses, and raise income.

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The Most Taxing Parts of Applying to Law School

It’s tax day, but since you’re reading this blog, taxes probably aren’t the only potentially tedious and painful item on your plate. Applying to law school is taxing in its own special way.

Most taxing in terms of time investment: Technically, your GPA is probably the aspect of your law school application in which you’ve invested the most time. But you probably would’ve done all that work even if you weren’t going to law school, so we won’t count it.

The second most time-consuming aspect of your application is the LSAT. Note that you don’t have to spend too much time on the LSAT — you can theoretically just show up — but if you’re doing it well, you’ll want to spend at least 3 months studying (and that would be 3 months of very intense studying).

Most taxing in terms of money: Applying to law school is, in general, an expensive process.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.11.14

A) Heads up: There’s gonna be a ticket frenzy when you graduate law school. Above the Law.

B) Just a reminder that the inventor of Spanx bombed her LSAT. Women’s Agenda.

C) Ann Levine has some ideas for how you should spend your summer before applying to law school. Above the Law.

D) A woman who killed her boyfriend with a stiletto heel received life in prison. USA Today.

E) You’ve never heard a song more SEO-optimized than this little ditty about social media. Management Today.

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What the Recent Increase in LSAT Test-Takers Really Means

About 200 more people sat for the February LSAT in 2014 than for the February 2013 LSAT. What does this mean? Are law school application numbers on their way to recovery? Probably. Will law school admissions become more completive? Yup.

Here’s a closer look at the ramifications of the recent increase in LSAT test-takers:

The Legal Market Is Improving

The legal profession, like most others, hasn’t been doing so hot since the 2007 financial crisis. Law firm hiring fell, as did real salaries. Many college graduates responded by not taking the LSAT, and not applying to law school.

However, things are getting better.