Tag Archive: cancelling lsat

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2013 October LSAT Score Cancellation Deadline is Tomorrow

Let’s cut directly to the chase. If you want to cancel your 2013 October LSAT score, then LSAC needs to receive notice by tomorrow. Did that make a certain part of your body pucker? Don’t worry, that’s appropriate.

Before we discuss whether or not you ought to cancel your October LSAT score, let’s tell you how to do so.

There are three means by which to contact the LSAT overlords: 1) send a signed fax, 2) overnight a letter or 3) send LSAC’s printable LSAT score cancellation form by expedited mail. Make sure you actually request an LSAT score cancellation, include your name and LSAC account number and a signature. After that, you need only bite your nails in agony whilst you await confirmation from on high that your request was received.

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Sunday is the Last Day to Cancel Your June LSAT Score

How’s the weekend going? Good? Good.

If you took the June LSAT, that might not be the case. Every day you have to wait for your LSAT score, the stress compounds. At some point, it’s fair to ask yourself, “Should I cancel my June LSAT score?”

It’s a hard question to answer (and one we’ve tackled for previous LSATs), but it won’t do you any good to try and cancel after tomorrow. That’s because Sunday marks the end of the six day deadline to cancel your June LSAT score.

Whatever your decision, this is your friendly reminder that you have until midnight EST to cancel your June LSAT score.

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What to Consider Before Cancelling Your October LSAT Score

If you took the October 2012 LSAT, then the window for cancelling your LSAT score is rapidly closing. You have only six calendar days from the day of the October LSAT to formally request that LSAC cancel your LSAT score (so, by Friday). Lucky for you, they offer a number of ways for you to pull the proverbial ripcord.

You can 1) send a signed fax, 2) overnight a letter or 3) send LSAC’s printable cancellation form by expedited mail. Make sure you actually request an LSAT score cancellation, include your name and LSAC account number and a signature. Then just wait for confirmation that your parachute was properly deployed (no mixing metaphors in this paragraph!).

Now that we’ve got that bit of housekeeping out of the way, you need to decide whether or not to cancel your LSAT score.

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How Retakers Should Reapproach Their LSAT Prep

If you cancelled your October LSAT score and you’re retaking in December, this here’s for you. And right away, here’s what needs to happen: change. However you tackled your LSAT prep last time around, it wasn’t enough. So things have to be different this time.

Different how? Well, it depends on what didn’t work last time. You need to look at the months of LSAT prep leading up to October’s test, and find out what went wrong.

For many people, one factor (often the largest) is time. Maybe you just need more time for LSAT prep to get you to your target score. Often people find their score to be going on a great upward trajectory, but it just didn’t get to where they wanted it to be in time. Studying for two more months will no doubt help. But really, really, really make time. Really.

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Considering Withdrawing from or Postponing Your LSAT?

While some of you may be going through other withdrawals a few days after the LSAT (both alcohol withdrawal from the bender you’ve been on, and Adderall withdrawal because you just needed that extra boost), today we’re going to address the new withdrawal policy by the LSAC and how it applies to the test Saturday.

First off, the new policy allows you to withdraw up until midnight Friday. That means you better pull the trigger by 11:59:59 P.M. EST if you don’t want the law schools to know that you were registered for October. Withdrawing means that no law school will be any wiser.

Now, onto the meat of the article.