Tag Archive: Common Fallacies

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Flawctober: The Absence of Evidence Fallacy

“Professor Jones believes the ark is located in Egypt. However, the sources he trusted were recently shown to be lying, so the ark must be somewhere other than Egypt.”

“I saw a ghost in my house last night. My friend Shaggy told me that no one has ever proven the existence of ghosts, so what I saw must have been my friend wearing a sheet.”

That’s right, today we’re discussing the spookiest of fallacies – the absence of evidence fallacy.

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Flawctober: The Perception vs. Reality Fallacy

“Gwyneth Paltrow says that the best way to cure a cold is to drink a big mug of peppermint tea mixed with apple cider vinegar, so anyone beginning to feel cold symptoms should imbibe this mixture as a surefire way of making themselves feel better.”

“A newspaper conducted a survey of 100 football fans, 75% of whom said that football-related brain damage is not a serious concern for professional football players. One can thus conclude that NFL players have nothing to worry about when it comes to whether their sport of choice is harming their brains.”

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The Typical Argument Types Typically Go Wrong on the LSAT

Describe questions (questions that ask of an argument’s “method of reasoning” or how the argument “proceeds”) have kind of a funny place on the LSAT. On the one hand, they’re not terribly common. You might see a couple on test day, or you might just as easily not see any at all. But the skill they test, describing reasoning with the subject matter abstracted out, is important to a lot of things on the LSAT.

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Identifying Flaws in Your Twitter Feed: A New Frontier in LSAT Preparation

Like your average Millennial, it’s hard for me to imagine a world without the entertainment and distraction of Twitter. After all, Twitter is a virtual library of prime LSAT-worthy argumentation just waiting to be deconstructed. Sure, there are the few absolutely faultless demi-gods of Twitter (I’m looking at you Ryan Reynolds), but there is also a noticeable amount of argumentation on Twitter that is rife with fallacious reasoning indistinguishable from the stimulus of your standard Flaw question.

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All the amazing ways the common fallacies can help you

Earlier this week, we gave you a rundown on some of the most common fallacies on the LSAT. It is, of course, helpful to understand those fallacies for Flaw questions in the Logical Reasoning section. However, familiarity with common flaws also helps you in other sections of the LSAT.

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To strengthen an argument, you must first know its weaknesses

When we have to fix something in real life, we know we first have to identify the problem. We know this is true even in areas in which we have little knowledge or expertise. And yet, when people are asked to fix stuff on the LSAT, this understanding flies out the window.