Tag Archive: correlation

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Flawesome!

Flaw Questions are the most common single question type on the LSAT. They also happen to be my favorite question type. I love pointing out people’s flaws, but people don’t always appreciate it. Like this one time, a guy at my house was about to say “glad,” but then changed it to “nice,” and it came out “glice.” I tried to point out the error, but somehow I was the bad guy?

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What’s LSAT got to do with it?

As you may have heard, bar passage rates aren’t looking stellar this year, and a lot of people are trying to figure out why and what to do about it.
There aren’t too many concrete numbers that can be examined in relation to bar passage rates – for instance, it’s difficult to compare GPAs across different law schools to determine whether a student’s GPA correlates to success on the bar, because different schools may curve or weigh grades differently.

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LSAT Logic Flaws on the Big Screen

We’re pretty close to the September LSAT, and I bet you’re pretty sick of thinking about it. Me too.

So rather than tackling a specific element of the test, or how you should be studying, or even talking law school applications, I want to turn your attention to one of society’s safe havens for logic flaws and faulty arguments: Hollywood.

Let’s take a look at the logical fallacies in three of the most famous lines in movie history.

1. “You want the truth? You can’t handle the truth!” – A Few Good Men

This oft-quoted Sorkinism is one of the most well-known movie quotes ever, in part because it’s delivered by one of Hollywood’s greatest stars.

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LSAT Logic Flaws: Correlation vs. Causation

Ever had this experience? Your gooberish buddy stumbles up to you, a couple drinks too deep, and spouts out an epiphany that (to him) rivals Einstein’s Annus Mirabilis. You and your LSAT-prepped mind, however, are not impressed. Something about the logic doesn’t sit right. It gives you an uneasy feeling deep in your gut — a sensation exacerbated by the PBR and stale pretzels sloshing around down there.

Let’s take an example. Say your friend — let’s call him Elliot — adamantly insists that when he stood up, Sexy Sadie looked over. He’s convinced that his standing caused her eyes to linger longingly on his portly physique and freshly-starched robin’s egg Polo.

You tell him, in accordance with your studies, that there are three methods by which we may seek to weaken a causal claim.

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Logical Reasonings / 12.21.11

A) Even law school readings won’t prepare you to review 65 million documents for one case. Above the Law.

B) Correlation and causation get confused again, this time in the realm of marriage. Shine.

C) Lincoln Memorial University’s new law school is still struggling to get ABA approval.
The Chronicle

D) A former law professor supports jury nullification — at least in cases concerning marijuana. ABA Journal.

E) Seventeen movies to get excited for in 2012 (Breaking Dawn Part 2 unfortunately didn’t make the cut). The Atlantic.