Tag Archive: curve

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Logic Games and the Curve

And we’re finishing up our fantastic voyage through the June 2018 LSAT today with Logic Games and “the curve.” In many ways, these are the easiest parts of the LSAT to predict. And yet, in my experience, these are the two sections students freak out about the most. The chance of getting a completely novel game tends to worry a lot of test takers. And yet, pretty much every games section features one basic ordering game, one tiered ordering game, a grouping game of some sort, and then either a second grouping game or a game that combines ordering and grouping. People worry about whether they’re going to get a hard test or an easy test, and then if it’s an easy test, they worry that the curve will be totally unforgiving. But, not for nothing, our resident LSAT soothsayer has been nailing the curve for awhile now.

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Understanding Your LSAT Score: The “Curve,” Explained

In a surprise move, LSAT scores were released late last night (so much for day-old promises, LSAC), which means a bunch of LSAT students have a shiny new LSAT score. You’ll hopefully hear lots of score recipients gushing about their scores, and you’ll probably hear some folks who are bummed out as well (we’ll have a post for those guys in the next couple days).

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Test Equating: The LSAT Curve Explained

They call it The Curve With Verve. Okay, they don’t call it that, but it isn’t your run-of-the-mill test curve. They don’t even call it a curve, in fact. It’s called test equating, and, yes, that narcolepsy inducing phrase has a lot to do with how the rest of your life is going to turn out. That’s assuming you want to be a lawyer. If not, you’re fine.

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How Did You Do on the September LSAT?

Yesterday was the last major milestone in the circle of September LSAT prep (naaaaants ingonyama bagithi baba): score release day.

After weeks of anxiety, preppers got to experience just a little bit more — one final gift from LSAC — as scores rolled out painfully slowly, amid reports of crashes on the LSAC website. But hopefully the wait was worth it.

The September curve came in at -12 (that’s twelve wrong answers for a score of 170), slightly less generous than the previous two LSAT’s, but still more lenient than the historical average. This makes some amount of sense, as most of what we’ve heard suggests a fairly middle of the road exam: no outrageously difficult or surprising sections, but nothing that could be called a cakewalk, either.