Tag Archive: cycle

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Logical Reasonings / 3.10.15

A) Predicting the 2015-2016 law school admissions cycle. Spoiler: It’s just like Back to the Future 2. Spivey Consulting

B) Reps from Above the Law, Law School Transparency and LSAT Blog talk (argue) about the law schools that are dropping their LSAT requirement. HuffPost Live

C) Track how much law school tuition has increased over time using this nifty tool. Then dry your tears with a nifty Kleenex. Bar Exam Stats

D) Lego Supreme Court Justices. ‘Nuff said. Maiaw

E) Check out this painting of London by a 19th century Japanese artist who had never visited. Slate

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All Your February LSAT Application Options

What a glorious week all you February LSAT takers are waking up to. Exhausted, curled up, wrung out? Take heart; you could be in Boston.

Here’s some of the best news, though. For many years I’ve been banging the drum to apply EARLY, EARLY, EARLY in the admissions cycle. Recently, though, it’s been more of a finger tapping.

Many people who submitted their applications last fall are already getting acceptances, so that hasn’t changed, and that’s a nice bonus for them. But the good news for you, dear Februaries, is that there’s never been a better time to be applying late in the cycle.

Many law schools are in wait-and-see mode as application volume has dropped like a stone for several years.

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What To Do With December LSAT Disappointment

The LSAT is a cruel, cruel mistress—it takes your time and money, it makes you stress and worry, and it can leave you depressed and disappointed. If you’ve been left unsatisfied by your December LSAT score or feel as though you’ve been jilted at the altar of law school applications, this post is meant to help you evaluate your options.

First and foremost, you should consider whether or not your score is truly subpar. When I got my LSAT results, I was a little disappointed because I scored lower than I had on several practice tests. I briefly considered retaking. Upon further consideration, I realized that my actual score was the same as my average practice test score (even though it was lower than my highest results). Furthermore, while I was not within the score range for my reach schools, I was squarely within the range for my target schools.