Tag Archive: diary

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How I Bombed My First LSAT

I’m going to talk about the first time I took the LSAT. Hoo boy – unlike Branden or Laura, I was, straight up, a hot mess.

Allow me to explain. I had decided a few months prior to go to law school and fulfill my destiny of becoming a hotshot lawyer. I had it all planned out: In order to become a hotshot lawyer, I had to get into a good law school, and in order to get into a good law school, I had to take the LSAT and do really, really, really well on it. I was going to take the late September LSAT, so I’d have plenty of time to work on my law school applications.

I self-studied, and had no idea what was going on. The LSAT was completely foreign to me. The first thing I did was a practice test, and I did terribly. I was twenty points away from a perfect score on the SAT when I took it at 15, so bombing this practice LSAT made me spend a lot of time googling, “Do people get dumber over time?” and “sugar brain deterioration.”

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LSAT Instructor: The End of 1L

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He started as a 1L at Columbia Law School in the fall, and has been writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences.

I’m almost at the end of my first year of law school. I have one more exam to go: Property. Japanese Law, Crim, and Torts are done. I have no idea how I did, but I’m alternating between disgust, resignation, and occasional bouts of wild optimism.

Taking a law school exam is neither science nor art. It’s more like alchemy. You don’t really know what you’re doing but you construct a system of symbols and incantations called an “outline”, and that system sometimes produces good outcomes, though it always falls short of gold.

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My First LSAT: Cut Through the B.S.

From time to time, we ask a Blueprint instructor to reflect on his or her experiences studying for the LSAT. Today we welcome Robert Seaney of New York. To read past installments, click here.

Everyone’s approach to the LSAT is going to be a little bit different. When I began my studies, I was told that you just have to figure out which is the experimental section (good luck…), and spend that 35 minute segment sneakily going back to answer the scored questions. I was told by others that Reading Comprehension is specifically designed to be completable only for those who know how to speed-read; a two-time 180 scorer told me that the key is in meditation; and a dubious gentleman studying at Florida Coastal insisted that you really don’t even need to study.

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LSAT Instructor: The Second Semester Blues

J. Peterman: Bad news, people. Peggy is home sick.
Elaine: Oh, please.
J. Peterman: She’s stuffed up, achy, and suffering from intense malaise.
Elaine: Oh, come on, we all have intense malaise. Right?

Second semester of 1L is notoriously rough.


You get your first semester’s grades. Back in November, a professor pointed out that none of us were used to being B students, but a fair chunk of us would become B students. The curve demands Bs, and a lot of ‘em. Even if you beat the curve, you’re bummed for your friends that didn’t, but deserved to.

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What I Learned From Bombing the LSAT

As part of a continuing series of LSAT diaries, new Blueprint instructor Andrew Kravis tells us about the lessons he learned from his first LSAT. Find thoughts from two other instructors in Part 1 and Part 2.

The first time I took the LSAT, I was 19. It was the fall of my junior year of undergrad at the University of Michigan, and I was set to graduate the following spring with an English degree and a foggy idea of what I wanted to do with my life. As an insecure kid who measured his self-worth entirely on the basis of academic performance, naturally I locked in on applying to master’s programs. I researched the best schools for comparative literature and queer theory, booked campus visits, and set dates to take the GRE and the GRE Subject Test in Literature in English.

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Blueprint Instructor: How I Nailed My First LSAT

A few weeks ago, Blueprint LSAT instructor Branden Frankel shared his tale about the first time he took the LSAT. Branden exemplifies the laid-back, West Coast, chill approach to one’s first LSAT attempt. I, on the other hand, exhibited the uptight, Type A, super paranoid (but prepared!) approach to LSAT-taking. (Hmm, maybe I should have become a lawyer after all….)

Back in the day, I was a fresh-faced, bright-eyed pre-law student with big dreams and an even bigger stack of #2 pencils. I had taken an LSAT course with this company I’d never heard of prior to researching classes called Blueprint LSAT Prep. I had been scoring well on my practice exams and was feeling pretty confident about my odds of getting the score I wanted.

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LSAT Instructor: Starting My Second Semester of Law School

Law school exams are over, winter vacation is behind me, and grades are in.

Exams were pretty stressful. Law school grades fall on a curve. A curve says, “It’s not about you doing well, it’s about others doing worse than you.” Brutal.

But it helps if you have an awesome study group. Someone to help you figure out why the right answers are right, and why the wrong answers are wrong. Someone to tell you that you that you’re scaring them after you drink your twelfth espresso. It’s also easier to take a break from studying if you can drag a few people out with you to the movies or to the museum.

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Logical Reasonings / 12.18.14

A) This essay written by a 3L looking back on her first-year law school self is a must read, and not just because she’s charmingly Austrailian. Survive Law

B) Some profs are dropping discussions of rape law from their criminal law classes due to complaints from sensitive students. ABA Journal

C) If the above story seems crazy to you because rape is a crime, you’re not alone. Above The Law

D) The lead guitarist from Blind Melon is now a legal associate with his JD from a T14 law school. Life is pretty strange, indeed. Wall Street Journal

E) Tonight is the last episode of The Colbert Report. Mourn with sixteen clips of him (hilariously) breaking character. Vulture

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LSAT Instructor: My First Law School Exams

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He started as a 1L at Columbia Law School this semester, and is writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences.

I just took my first final exam. Contracts. I loved my Contracts class. The exam, not so much.

The exam was open book. We had a multiple choice section, and an essay.

Law school exams are very different from undergrad exams. On the essay portion, there was no right answer. You just had to spot the major issues, argue both sides, come to a reasonable conclusion, and stay under the word limit. In undergrad, you just get to info dump and hope for the best, or you get to check your work.

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Logical Reasonings / 10.9.14

An admissions consultant analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of a real law school personal statement. jdMission

The final diary of a September LSAT taker. LSAT Blog

Law school accreditation standards get an update after six years of effort. Six years of effort? Sounds like my last marriage! Hey-o! ABA Journal

Elon law is cutting tuition by $14,000, along with a host of other changes. Greensboro News & Record

Who else is about to leave work and get in line for Tomorrowland? Vulture