Tag Archive: grouping games

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A Grouping Game Overview

If you’re a student in one of Blueprint’s classes, you’ve probably wrapped up grouping games recently. What makes an In and Out game different from the rest? How are stable games different from unstable games? And what was a profiling game again? Let’s recap and talk about distinguishing the different types of grouping games from each other.

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Here we go, yo (again) … Scenarios for grouping games

When you can break an LSAT logic game down into a few possibilities up front, we call that making scenarios. When you do it right, it can make so many games so much easier, but you have to know when to use it. We covered hints that you might want to do scenarios in ordering games a couple weeks ago. Today, let’s talk about when scenarios are a good idea in grouping games.

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Finding Subtle Deductions in Logic Games

Today’s post is in response to a student question about Logic Games:

Other than looking for variables in common, how can you find ways to get deductions from combining rules?

Of course, the easiest way to make deductions is to look at multiple rules covering the same variable or spot. But as the student asks, what about when that doesn’t happen? It doesn’t mean there’s nothing to be found. It’s often all about what takes up space.

In an ordering game, if there are multiple blocks, especially if they’re big, assess how they’ll fit together. Will they have to overlap? Will they get in each other’s way? Sometimes, this leads to a concrete deduction.

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Tackling Overstuffed LSAT Logic Games (and Figuring Out Uber)

Our review of Logic Games continues today with an investigation into the thrilling world of Grouping Games. Specifically, Grouping Games of the overbooked variety.

Remember last weekend? When you and your buddies were trying to get home from the bars at 2 AM? You called an Uber, but in your drunken stupor you neglected to select the Uber XL. So up rolls a Prius — you could swear it’s even smaller than usual — and of course you’re left with four seats for the six of you to squeeze into. The game is overbooked. We could leave some homies curbside, but we’re feeling kind-hearted. So you’re doomed to squeeze. How could you arrange yourselves?

Let’s say the game gives these parameters:
One person immediately calls shotgun, so that’s taken, and the two who’ve been making eyes at each other throughout the evening all-too-eagerly offer to sit lapsies in the far left bench seat.

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Opera and Froyo: The Supreme Court LSAT Grouping Game

Note: The following statements are purely fictional. The names listed are in no way intended to represent actual people. Any allusions to real events are merely coincidental.

Nine Supreme Court Justices: Alito, Breyer, Ginsburg, Kagan, Kennedy, Roberts, Scalia, Sotomayor, and Thomas, are presiding over the case California v. United States (2012), involving California’s ‘Remove Arizona from the Union Act’. At issue is whether it is constitutional for California, the most populous, economically powerful, and generally awesome state, to force the secession of Arizona from the United States due to its controversial immigration policies. The Justices will vote either ‘For’ or ‘Against’, according to the following conditions:

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Predictions for the December 2011 LSAT

Here we go again. As the tryptophan-induced daze wears off, LSAT students are faced with a brutal reality. The December LSAT is just two days away.

At this point, studying is rather pointless. In fact, relying on those good old “cramming” techniques that got you through freshman biology would be counterproductive in the final days. So what can we offer you for guidance at this point?

Semi-outlandish predictions about what will appear on the December LSAT, that’s what.

1. Experimenting with the Experimental

For years, nay, for decades, the experimental (unscored) section of the test has been one of the first three sections.