Tag Archive: instructor

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Reddit AMA with veteran Blueprint instructor today at 1 pm PST!

For those of you not in the know, AMA stands for “Ask Me Anything.” Just like it sounds, you can ask me anything. I’m assuming your questions about the LSAT will be at the forefront, but I also graduated from UCLA School of Law in 2010, so feel free to ask me about UCLA, law school in general, the admissions process, how I get my hair so shiny, what that noise is — anything!

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True Life: I Was an LSAT Instructor

This post is dedicated to the man behind the curtain, so to speak. If you’re studying for the LSAT, you might be curious about what it’s like to actually teach the test. I’ll be giving you my insights on becoming a Yoda… or Mr. Miyagi… or… Rafiki of the LSAT world (if you don’t understand any of those references, you need to watch more movies). I’ll also briefly discuss the benefits and downsides of teaching a class.

First things first: To become an LSAT instructor, you need to perform well on the LSAT (Captain Obvious here, saying “you’re welcome, everyone!”). A solid score on the LSAT is a good marker of your ability to understand the concepts. With that said, scoring a 180 – that’s a perfect score, just so we’re clear – doesn’t mean that you’ll get hired as an instructor; you also need to show that you can actually instruct effectively. Ideally, instructors can communicate clearly and succinctly and present the material with humor and charisma.

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How I Bombed My First LSAT

I’m going to talk about the first time I took the LSAT. Hoo boy – unlike Branden or Laura, I was, straight up, a hot mess.

Allow me to explain. I had decided a few months prior to go to law school and fulfill my destiny of becoming a hotshot lawyer. I had it all planned out: In order to become a hotshot lawyer, I had to get into a good law school, and in order to get into a good law school, I had to take the LSAT and do really, really, really well on it. I was going to take the late September LSAT, so I’d have plenty of time to work on my law school applications.

I self-studied, and had no idea what was going on. The LSAT was completely foreign to me. The first thing I did was a practice test, and I did terribly. I was twenty points away from a perfect score on the SAT when I took it at 15, so bombing this practice LSAT made me spend a lot of time googling, “Do people get dumber over time?” and “sugar brain deterioration.”

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Blueprint Instructor: How I Nailed My First LSAT

A few weeks ago, Blueprint LSAT instructor Branden Frankel shared his tale about the first time he took the LSAT. Branden exemplifies the laid-back, West Coast, chill approach to one’s first LSAT attempt. I, on the other hand, exhibited the uptight, Type A, super paranoid (but prepared!) approach to LSAT-taking. (Hmm, maybe I should have become a lawyer after all….)

Back in the day, I was a fresh-faced, bright-eyed pre-law student with big dreams and an even bigger stack of #2 pencils. I had taken an LSAT course with this company I’d never heard of prior to researching classes called Blueprint LSAT Prep. I had been scoring well on my practice exams and was feeling pretty confident about my odds of getting the score I wanted.

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Who Does Your LSAT Prep Course Hire?

Did you read the real live job posting seeking LSAT instructors above? If not, take a minute to familiarize (or perhaps horrify) yourself.

Are you back now? Good.

Faces and names have been blurred to protect the, well… not the innocent. No, certainly not. For they are guilty! Guilty of hiring instructors who have no business teaching the LSAT.

You want to be a lawyer. You need a great score on the LSAT to get into a great school to get a great job to be fabulously wealthy to show all those jerks at your high school reunion how much better you are at life than they are. The first step in that glorious chain of victory is every bit as important as all the other steps.

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LSAT Instructor: My First Law School Exams

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He started as a 1L at Columbia Law School this semester, and is writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences.

I just took my first final exam. Contracts. I loved my Contracts class. The exam, not so much.

The exam was open book. We had a multiple choice section, and an essay.

Law school exams are very different from undergrad exams. On the essay portion, there was no right answer. You just had to spot the major issues, argue both sides, come to a reasonable conclusion, and stay under the word limit. In undergrad, you just get to info dump and hope for the best, or you get to check your work.