Tag Archive: june lsat score

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What to Do If Your June LSAT Score Came Back Lousy

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

If you are disappointed in your LSAT score, you need to start by putting it in perspective. Is your LSAT score really, objectively lousy (for example, in the 130s) or is it lousy based on your abilities, or lousy compared to what a particular law school accepts? If it’s simply that all of your friends did better, or that it won’t give your parents bragging rights, then that’s probably reason to book an hour with a therapist. But if it’s disappointing because of its impact on your goals, here are some strategies to consider:

1. Evaluate reasons for your poor performance.

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LSAC Releases 2014 June LSAT Scores: How’d You Do?

You might want to turn off the World Cup and check your email.

LSAC has just released the first batch of 2014 June LSAT scores. If you haven’t received yours yet, don’t panic. LSAC releases LSAT scores in random batches throughout the day. You might get yours at noon. You might get it at midnight. The important thing is, you’re getting it.

So, what stands out about the 2014 June LSAT?

First, let’s start with the curve. The 2014 June LSAT (101 questions) featured an LSAT curve of -13 — meaning you could miss 13 questions and still get a 170 LSAT score.

You could have missed 20 questions for a 165, -29 for a 160, or -46 for a 150.

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2014 June LSAT: To Cancel Your LSAT Score or Not to Cancel

So you took the June LSAT Monday. It wasn’t the dreamlike experience you hoped it would be. Now you’re wondering, “Should I cancel my LSAT score?”

We’re here to help.

First, let’s go over what it means to cancel your LSAT score and how to do it. LSAC has to receive your cancellation request within six days of the LSAT. You can send your request by fax or overnight mail; there’s no way to cancel your LSAT score online. LSAC tells you exactly what you need to send to cancel your LSAT score.

If you cancel your June LSAT score, law schools will see that you took the exam and canceled, but they won’t ever know what you would have scored.

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2014 June LSAT Morning Cometh: Staying Positive, Patient

So after months of studying, practice tests and hard work, you’ve finally taken the 2014 June LSAT. This should be cause for celebration, but maybe you’re not in the most jovial mood. Maybe things didn’t go smoothly for you yesterday. Maybe you’re worried about your LSAT score. And then there was that damned Logic Game. (“What the flip was that, LSAC?!”)

We wouldn’t blame you if these thoughts were running through your mind today. But keep one thing in mind: you’re not the only one. Were you a bit shaky in section 1 yesterday because of the nerves? So were other people. Did you have a less-than-stellar proctoring experience? Chances are someone else’s was worse (read some of the comments from yesterday’s 2014 June LSAT Instant Recap!). And that brutal fourth Logic Game? Yep, join the club.