Tag Archive: law school admissions

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Analyzing ‘Top 10 Law Schools For Career Prospects’

Most people who want to go to law school want to become a lawyer. That’s probably a safe bet. Plus, law school can leave you with a lot of debt to pay off. It’s therefore important to consider employment statistics carefully as you choose a law school. Writing for Forbes, Susan Adams recently took a look at the top 10 law schools for career prospects, as ranked by the Princeton Review guide, The Best 173 Law Schools.

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How to Get Letters of Recommendation

When I was an undergrad, I went to office hours with my professors a maximum of one time per semester on average. I didn’t like speaking in class, and I never stayed after to ask questions at the end of class. As you might imagine, this made it somewhat difficult to find professors who would remember me, let alone write a letter of recommendation on my behalf. If you’re in a similar position, this post is for you—I’ll be going over some ways to try to get letters of recommendation when you’re not particularly close with any of your professors.

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What Majors Are Best for Law School?

Undergrads with dreams of eventually attending law school often wonder if there are certain majors that will better prepare you for law school (or that will make your application look better). I’ll go ahead and end the suspense now: There’s definitely no mandatory major if you plan to head to law school. With that said, you can definitely do some thinking and maneuvering to put you in the best position when it comes time for applications. Here’s some general tips and advice for when you’re deciding:

The most important thing is to do something that you know you’ll do well at. With law schools being a numbers-oriented business, that’s the most important piece of advice I can give.

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Writing an Explanatory Essay That Passes the Eye Roll Test

You’ve taken the LSAT, crafted a killer personal statement, and secured your letters of recommendation. In theory, admissions committees have all the information they need to make a decision. But what if a first glance at that information would give them the wrong idea about your capabilities – say, if you had a mediocre GPA because of a really low GPA one semester, or if you had to take the LSAT multiple times?

Guess what, kids – you’re in luck, because rather than trying to weave in an explanation in your personal statement, you get a chance to put it all in the explanatory essay. An explanatory essay is like it sounds—you get a chance to provide an explanation for something problematic.

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How Useful Are LSAC Evaluations?

Five years ago, LSAC rolled out an evaluation service. Evaluations are like letters of recommendations—those who know you judge your personal capabilities based on what they have seen of you—but in quantified form. There are questions within categories such as intellectual skill and task management, and, for each question, evaluators must select from the same answer choices: Below Average (Bottom 50%), Average (Top 50%), Good (Top 25%), Very Good (Top 10%), Excellent (Top 5%), Truly Exceptional (Top 1–2%), and Inadequate Opportunity to Judge. Evaluators also had space in each category (up to 750 characters) to make comments.

Back then, three schools required evaluations: Albany Law School, University of Detroit Mercy, and University of Montana.

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Logical Reasonings / 8.27.15

A) There’s still time to save 20% on all tutoring from Blueprint LSAT Prep – but the sale ends tomorrow. Blueprint LSAT

B) If you’re asking for letters of recommendation, here are some quick tips for your recommender. LSAT Blog

C) Although recent law school class sizes have shrunk, at least one person thinks they should be declining even more. The Wall Street Journal

D) For people in law school, here are some reasons to avoid that pizza after a long night in the library. Law School Toolbox

E) Taylor Swift sang “Smelly Cat” with Lisa Kudrow. That is all. Rolling Stone

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Hindsight Is 20/20: Reviewing My Own Personal Statement

Today we’re bringing back a classic post from the vault. This post was originally published on October 18, 2011 – and, much like a fine wine, has only improved with age. Matt Shinners is a Harvard Law graduate who taught and provided application counseling for Blueprint LSAT Prep. His application clearly turned out *okay*, but nevertheless, we can all learn from his successes (and failures, such as they are).

I applied to law school in October/November of 2006 with a 3.7/180 and the following law school personal statement. It was not even close to the strongest element of my application package.

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Choosing a Law School: How Much Does Location Matter?

After you’ve combed through your stacks on stacks on stacks of acceptance letters, you’re on to one of the trickiest parts of the law school application process (after the Mauve Dinosaur game, of course): actually picking a school.

Among the myriad factors you’ll want to consider is location, location, location. Are you hoping to move back to your small town to practice after graduating? Are you dying to get out of suburbia? Itching to get to the Big Apple? Sunny California?

If so, it can be advisable to try and select a law school near your target area. For example, if you want to live and work in Los Angeles, then picking USC over Georgetown may make sense, despite the latter’s higher rank (lots to be said for the fickleness of rankings anyway — but you get the idea here).

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Logical Reasonings / 7.23.15

A) Do you want a FREE copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games? Of course you do. Get it while it’s hot. Blueprint LSAT Prep

B) We’ve got a laundry list of live LSAT classes starting in the next week, and you could be in one of them. Blueprint LSAT Prep

C) Surprise! It turns out that your chances of getting into a higher-ranked law school are better if you have a higher LSAT score. U.S. News

D) The verdict is in: Not only are butt dials awkward and potentially embarrassing, but you don’t have a reasonable expectation of privacy for them. Bloomberg

E) Here’s a movement both parties can get behind: Obama issuing an executive order to keep Jon Stewart from leaving the show. Newsweek