Tag Archive: law school advice

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Logical Reasonings / 8.12.15

A) Preparing for the October LSAT? Check out this great deal on our awesome online course. Blueprint LSAT

B) Aside from your beloved teddy bear, here are the non-obvious things to bring with you for your first year of law school. Law School Toolbox

C) Michael Jordan is in court – and during jury selection, when asked if anyone considered Jordan his or her personal idol, only one potential juror said yes. We’ve come a long way since the days of Space Jam. ESPN

D) Hillary Clinton recently released a plan that involves lowering student loan interest rates – but here’s the downside. NPR

E) Here are some tips for viewing the best meteor shower of the year tonight. iO9

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4 Things to Do Before You Start Law School

Today, we’re happy to welcome Alison Monahan, founder of The Girl’s Guide to Law School and co-founder of the Law School Toolbox, Bar Exam Toolbox, and Trebuchet Legal, to the blog. She’s here to share some tips on starting off on the right foot in law school.

In these last few weeks before law school orientation, what – if anything – can you be doing to set yourself up for success as a law student? Reading the Constitution? Brushing up on the Federalist Papers? Yeah, probably not so helpful.

Here are a few things that might help!

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Choosing a Law School: How Much Does Location Matter?

After you’ve combed through your stacks on stacks on stacks of acceptance letters, you’re on to one of the trickiest parts of the law school application process (after the Mauve Dinosaur game, of course): actually picking a school.

Among the myriad factors you’ll want to consider is location, location, location. Are you hoping to move back to your small town to practice after graduating? Are you dying to get out of suburbia? Itching to get to the Big Apple? Sunny California?

If so, it can be advisable to try and select a law school near your target area. For example, if you want to live and work in Los Angeles, then picking USC over Georgetown may make sense, despite the latter’s higher rank (lots to be said for the fickleness of rankings anyway — but you get the idea here).

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Logical Reasonings / 7.28.15

A) How do law schools view LSAT scores? U.S. News

B) Baltimore Law has a new “incubator” to help students transition into solo practice. No word yet on why they chose such a creepy name for it. National Law Journal

C) Turns out that, contrary to popular belief, syllabi may contain useful information after all. Above the Law

D) There is an Ernest Hemingway lookalike contest. The pictures are creeping me out a little. Boing Boing

E) The NFL is upholding Tom Brady’s four-game suspension – and saying he destroyed his cell phone during the investigation. Deadspin

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Your Summer Homework: Letters of Recommendation

It’s summer. School’s out – well, not forever, but at least for a few months. If you’re applying to law school, that means it’s a good time to get around to asking for some letters of recommendation.

See, professors are notoriously slow at getting these things turned around. If you were a professor and had students asking you to take unpaid time to write about how great they are, you probably wouldn’t be in any big hurry either.

So summer has a couple advantages. First, professors often have a bit less going on in the summer time, so they might be a bit more inclined to get on it and write those letters. Just look at them; it’s clearly not like they’re taking off to the beach. Second, even if the professors you ask are as slow as usual, there’s plenty of time before you need to get those applications in. It won’t screw you over.

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How to Spend Your Last Summer of Freedom

If you’ve completed the LSAT, applied to schools, and accepted an offer of admission, congratulations! This post is dedicated to answering a very common question from rising first-year law students—how should I spend my summer before beginning law school? My answer, in a nutshell, is: “Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow you may die.”

The summer before I started law school, I went on vacation. I busied myself with watching movies, playing videogames, exercising, reading, and fishing. I tried to spend as much time as possible with my brother and my best friend, and I tried to put the thought of law school out of my mind entirely (with a couple exceptions that I’ll get to later). And I have no regrets.

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From the Archives: Should You Take a Law Preview Class?

Many of you reading this post have either recently graduated from college or will be doing so in the coming days and weeks. While you’re probably concerned with arranging enough tickets for family members you barely know to attend your graduation, the fall season and the beginning of law school have no doubt managed to creep into that brain of yours.

I’m willing to bet dimes and donuts (as my sixth-grade math teacher Mr. Brown once said) that the prospect of your impending matriculation has caused you some worry. How, you ask, will law school be different from undergrad? Do I need to change my study habits? Will I delve ever deeper into an unending caffeine addiction?

Given your consternation, you may have considered taking one of those law school preview classes that seem to be all the rage with the cool kids these days (how do you like my dated slang?).

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LL.M. Degrees: More Job Prospects, or Just More Letters?

Ah, the LL.M. degree. If you’ve ever gone to law school, you’ve cracked many a joke about the international students and their LL.M.’s. The Master of Laws degree is almost synonymous with a foreign student trying to get a degree that will give them a beachhead in the U.S.

And law schools are increasingly using it to entice more money out of already-indebted law students.

The American Prospect has a recent article about the growth of these programs, especially in the wake of a number of law schools being forced to cut faculty and salaries in order to maintain their bottom line. Law school applications continue to drop precipitously, and that makes it harder to attract qualified candidates. Schools need to leverage scholarships to keep their numbers up, eating into their profits.

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Advice on Advice: Where to Get Info on Law School Loans

I’ve previously discussed law school debt on the LSAT blog from the viewpoint of those who have already taken it out and are living with the consequences, in a vain attempt to convince a few of you that it’s not the best idea. So go back and read those, if you haven’t already.

Done? Good.

If you’re still set on financing law school with student loans (and I’m sure 99% of those who are reading this are in that boat), it’s important to be well-informed as to what you’re signing up for. The above links will show you what life’s like living under that much debt, but it doesn’t give you a lot of information about the nuts-and-bolts of the process.

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The Lowdown on LRAP: Magical Law School Debt Reliever?

Loan repayment assistance programs (LRAPs) are magic wands that make debt disappear for students who are good-hearted enough to enter public service. Sure, you’re earning a quarter of what your classmates are making, but you’re making the world a better place, and karma repays you for that. With your loan repayment, you get a unicorn to ride to work and a lifetime’s supply of free candy canes. Oh, and you officially get to celebrate your half-birthday, which means more presents!

There are many students who enter law school every year with dreams of entering public service after they graduate. The salaries aren’t nearly as high as those in the private sector; your loans, however, will be. So how do most students expect to cover the gap?