Tag Archive: law school application

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Early Decision vs. Early Action: Your Law School Applications

Surprise! It’s November, and that means that the early decision and early action deadlines for most law schools are fast approaching. The difference between early decision and early action is simple.

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Where to Find Law School Scholarships

Law school is expensive. Like, really expensive (here’s a cheery article on the subject). Unless you have a treasure trove of hidden cash stashed away somewhere, you are probably going to rely on some combination of scholarships, financial aid, and student loans to finance your legal education. This post is about the first of those financing options—scholarships. In general, students either receive scholarships from their schools or from outside organizations.

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Should You Write a Diversity Statement for Law School?

Everyone knows you need to write a personal statement when applying to law school, but did you know you might need to write a diversity statement too?
Before I share tips on how to write one, let’s first talk about the purpose of the diversity statement.

Good law schools want a rich learning environment for their students. A rich learning environment involves the inclusion of different perspectives, backgrounds, experiences, and philosophies contributing to the dialogue, debate, and discussion in each class. Good law schools recognize that having a diverse student body is a benefit to all law students (and to law professors as well). The diversity statement is one way to see if an applicant would contribute to a diverse 1L class, because the application form may not give the law school admissions committee enough information about the applicant’s background and diversity factors.

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Logical Reasonings / 7.22.15

A) Sorry Facebook, but hand all of it over. WSJ

B) #lawlibpickuplines – ’nuff said. Above The Law

C) Writing is a big thing for prelaws. Here are some resources to help you improve that skill. Pen and Chisel Blog

D) Law students make great pageant contestants. We ain’t mad. Above The Law

E) Who doesn’t love puppies? BuzzFeed

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Price Reduced for Blueprint’s September LSAT Online Course

If you’re still thinking about taking the September LSAT but haven’t started studying, it’s time to buckle down and make a decision.

Allow us to make it a little easier for you.

Blueprint LSAT Prep’s online course for the September LSAT is now available for a reduced price of $650. That’s a savings of $200 off the original price. However, it’s only for a limited time (and you’ve got less than two months to prepare for the exam, anyway), so act fast. You can enroll here.


If you’re looking for something to spend that extra $200 on, why not sign up for one of our upcoming law school application workshops?

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Law School Application Season Opens Soon: Are You Ready?

As July comes to a close, we are still a couple months away from law schools opening up the application season. Despite this, potential applicants should start working on their materials now in order to put themselves in the best position to succeed in the coming cycle. This post will specifically address two groups of applicants—first, students who took the June LSAT and are satisfied with their scores and, second, students who are planning on taking the September LSAT.

For both groups, if you haven’t done so already, sign up for the Credential Assembly Service offered through LSAC. Then, begin collecting letters of recommendation and requesting transcripts. Letters of recommendation are, obviously, contingent on recommenders and, as such, they are outside of the applicant’s control. Thus, requesting these letters early on will help make sure that there are no uncontrollable delays in your application.

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What to Do If Your June LSAT Score Came Back Lousy

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

If you are disappointed in your LSAT score, you need to start by putting it in perspective. Is your LSAT score really, objectively lousy (for example, in the 130s) or is it lousy based on your abilities, or lousy compared to what a particular law school accepts? If it’s simply that all of your friends did better, or that it won’t give your parents bragging rights, then that’s probably reason to book an hour with a therapist. But if it’s disappointing because of its impact on your goals, here are some strategies to consider:

1. Evaluate reasons for your poor performance.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.28.14

A) Relive your college days in your law school application. Law Admissions Lowdown.

B) Congratulations to Penn Law School on its second straight Webby Award. Penn Law.

C) Meet the lawyers on Time’s list of 100 most influential people. Above the Law.

D) George Clooney is engaged to a lawyer. You read that right: George Clooney is getting married! US Magazine.

E) You’ve never ordered anything from SkyMall. That’s about to change. I Write for SkyMall.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.21.14

A) Here’s one of three probable reasons your law school application was rejected. Law Admissions Lowdown.

B) Other colleges can learn an awful lot from law schools. Time.

C) OK, fine. You can sue Cheerios even if you “liked” them on Facebook. Aljazeera America.

D) This is why marshals are needed in courtrooms. CNN.

E) Giant shark in a tiny pickup truck? Just another Monday in Florida. GrindTV.