Tag Archive: law school diary

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LSAT Instructor: The Second Semester Blues

J. Peterman: Bad news, people. Peggy is home sick.
Elaine: Oh, please.
J. Peterman: She’s stuffed up, achy, and suffering from intense malaise.
Elaine: Oh, come on, we all have intense malaise. Right?

Second semester of 1L is notoriously rough.

January.

You get your first semester’s grades. Back in November, a professor pointed out that none of us were used to being B students, but a fair chunk of us would become B students. The curve demands Bs, and a lot of ‘em. Even if you beat the curve, you’re bummed for your friends that didn’t, but deserved to.

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LSAT Instructor: Starting My Second Semester of Law School

Law school exams are over, winter vacation is behind me, and grades are in.

Exams were pretty stressful. Law school grades fall on a curve. A curve says, “It’s not about you doing well, it’s about others doing worse than you.” Brutal.

But it helps if you have an awesome study group. Someone to help you figure out why the right answers are right, and why the wrong answers are wrong. Someone to tell you that you that you’re scaring them after you drink your twelfth espresso. It’s also easier to take a break from studying if you can drag a few people out with you to the movies or to the museum.

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LSAT Instructor: My First Law School Exams

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He started as a 1L at Columbia Law School this semester, and is writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences.

I just took my first final exam. Contracts. I loved my Contracts class. The exam, not so much.

The exam was open book. We had a multiple choice section, and an essay.

Law school exams are very different from undergrad exams. On the essay portion, there was no right answer. You just had to spot the major issues, argue both sides, come to a reasonable conclusion, and stay under the word limit. In undergrad, you just get to info dump and hope for the best, or you get to check your work.

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LSAT Instructor: One Month Into Law School

Alright, so I know I said in my last Columbia related post that law school isn’t all that bad, but I think I’m starting to crack.

We were debating in small groups whether extreme starvation can justify murder, if it’s for the purpose of cannibalizing the victim’s body. Things got a little heated. I may have threatened to eat someone.

This was highly out of character for me. I’m eating about 6 meals a day. Good stuff.

Okay, maybe I’m not eating the best stuff all the time. I get a few sandwiches, and about once a week I have the delicious NYC street food known as chicken over rice. Five bucks gets you a delicious plate of buttery self-loathing.

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LSAT Instructor: My First Week of Law Classes

Classes – the graded, real kind – started this week at Columbia. Sure, we did go through three weeks of Legal Methods, but that’s a pass-fail class that everyone passes.

Among other things, you’re supposed to get your first cold-calls out of the way in Legal Methods. You see, at law school, professors don’t wait for someone to contribute to the class discussion. They call on people. So you’d better be ready.

Or not.

Class participation usually won’t figure into your final grade, so you can flub all your cold-calls, but you’d better have a high tolerance for public shaming.

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LSAT Instructor: The Beginning Of Law School

I’ve been at Columbia Law School for just over three weeks. It’s been rough going. I’ve lost about 20 pounds off my bench press. The body can only take so much free pizza and booze.

Law school classes are in something less than a full swing. Columbia gently eases us in with a three-week class called Legal Methods. This is a pass-pass course; no one in the history of the school has failed Legal Methods. One brave 1L spent all of 5 minutes on her Legal Methods final. The professor gave her a stern talk (read: free lunch) and made her retake the exam.

She passed.

But some aren’t taking it easy. There have been rumors of a “gunner.”

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LSAT Instructor: What I Learned in Law School Admissions

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He is starting at Columbia Law School this fall, and will be writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences. Here’s part one and part two.

After sending out applications to 15 law schools, I would like to share with you what I’ve learned about law school admissions.

But first, a disclaimer:

First, I’m extremely happy with and feel fortunate about my admissions outcomes. Second, these are just my own takeaways; your experiences or opinions might vary.

Lesson #1: You can get waitlisted/rejected even with great numbers.

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Blueprint LSAT Prep Instructor: How I Chose Columbia Law

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He is starting at Columbia Law School this fall, and will be writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences. Here’s part one.

Believe it or not, some people will choose a law school based purely on the school’s place in the US News Rankings. Some think they’re being more clever by using the “Specialty Rankings.” Still others are attracted to such fringe benefits as having to swear off sex and booze – I’m looking at you BYU applicants.

For me, choosing a law school was all about cost of attendance versus job placement. I found that indeed, Puffy Daddy was right, it is all about the Benjamins.

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Blueprint LSAT Prep Instructor: Why I’m Going to Law School

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He is starting at Columbia Law School this fall, and will be writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences. Stay tuned!

There are about 300 law schools in the United States, and getting into at least one of them is pretty easy. But, for many, going to law school is a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad idea.

Still, going to law school can also be a good idea. I’ll tell you how I made my choice to go, and I’ll share some links to help you decide whether law school is right for you.

The Personal Reasons: Why Law?

In 2006, near the height of the law school boom, I went into my undergrad thinking I’d continue on to law school out of some vague ideas about a proclivity for writing and debate in high school.