Tag Archive: law school offers

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From the Archives: Handling Multiple Law School Offers

If you applied for admission to the law school class of 2017 you might now find yourself in the enviable position of having to make a decision between multiple offers of admission (yay you!). For the sake of this LSAT blog post, let’s say that you have it narrowed down to two schools. According to Anna Ivey, it’s not a great idea to put down multiple deposits for law school admission. It just confuses those bureaucrats in the law school admissions office anyway. So what’s a soon to be law student to do? Make a f*%#ing decision!

All veiled cussing aside, I’m going to attempt to make your law school admissions decision just a tad bit easier with a list of possibly relevant factors:

Handling Multiple Offers for Law School Admissions Tip I: Location, Location, Location

I know it’s a cliché, but location can be incredibly important in your decision.

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Thanks, But No Thanks: How to Decline Law School Offers

Today we have a guest post from Anna Ivey, founder of Ivey Consulting.

This week, I’ve been fielding questions from applicants about the right way to turn down offers from law schools. This post is for the “Awesome Problems to Have” files, because it assumes, of course, that you’ve already received an offer from a law school you really want to attend. Congratulations! I love this time of year, because this is when you start seeing the payoff for all your hard work, planning and patience. (Sometimes dumb luck helps too, but less than one would think.) Here are some common questions related to turning down law school offers:

1. Do I have to turn down the offer before the stated deposit deadline?

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Multiple Tips for Handling Multiple Law School Offers

If you applied for admission to the law school class of 2015 you might now find yourself in the enviable position of having to make a decision between multiple offers of admission (yay you!). For the sake of this blog post, let’s say that you have it narrowed down to two schools. According to Anna Ivey, it’s not a great idea to put down multiple deposits for law school admission. It just confuses those bureaucrats in the law school admissions office anyway. So what’s a soon to be law student to do? Make a f*%#ing decision!

All veiled cussing aside, I’m going to attempt to make your law school admissions decision just a tad bit easier with a list of possibly relevant factors:

Handling Multiple Offers for Law School Admissions Tip I: Location, Location, Location

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What to Do When the Law School Offers Start Coming In

The February LSAT has come and gone. Now it’s time to talk law school. More specifically, law school admissions. Even more specifically, law school admissions offers.

Let’s assume all your law school applications are complete (and if they’re not, stop reading and go take care of that, pronto). You’ve no doubt wondered to yourself (or possibly aloud to strangers) whether you’ll get into a top tier school. You’ve probably worried about what your recommenders put in their letters. The possibilities for anxiety are endless.

I’m going to attempt to soothe your worry-addled mind. How you ask? By telling you not to worry. It won’t do you any good at this point anyway. There is nothing more you can or should do at this point (except perhaps pick up a hobby to take your mind off of things).

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How to Navigate Law School Offers

With the February LSAT planted firmly in the rearview mirror, it’s time to get down to brass tacks. Why do they connote seriousness? Are tacks ever made of some other metal? If so, are those tacks more, or less serious? Do plastic pushpins ever get jealous? What’s that you say? You wanted to discuss law school? Well, if I must.

If you’ve taken the LSAT and all your applications are complete (which they damn well better be), you’re probably getting pretty anxious by now. Will I get into a top-tier school? Was it a good idea to pick a random “A” on my transcript and ask that professor to write my letter of recommendation even though I never visited his office as an undergrad? Do short women really prefer taller men?