Tag Archive: law school personal statement

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Law School Personal Statement Advice: CAPS LOCK EDITION

Today is NATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY, so go to town in the comments section. After all, how are people going to know that you are YELLING AT THEM THROUGH THE INTERNET if you haven’t utilized that oblong button sitting just next to your left pinky?

In reality, there are only four reasons to use the caps lock key:

1) Someone is WRONG ON THE INTERNET! And you have to set them straight.

2) You recognize that you are AN IDIOT AND WANT THE WORLD TO KNOW IT THROUGH YOUR TYPING.

3) You’re writing out the lyrics to Kenny Loggins’ DANGER ZONE.

4) You’re writing your law school personal statement.

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Cracking the Law School Admission Essay Question Code

Today’s guest LSAT blog post is from Anna Ivey, founder of Ivey Consulting — which has partnered with Blueprint LSAT Prep to take over all of our law school application consulting. Blueprint students get a discount on all 1-on-1 application consulting packages, so check them out now.

Before you start writing your law school application essays, it’s important to pay attention to the precise wording of each essay question and make sure you are answering that question — not that other school’s question, and not the question you wish were being asked. (Unless, of course, a school invites you to ask and answer your own question, as Georgetown was recently doing in an optional essay.)

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Five Keys to a Great Law School Résumé

Writing your law school personal statement is a daunting task. But at least you can quickly realize that you don’t have to boil your entire life down into two pages – you can tell a single story that had a profound impact on you.

The résumé, on the other hand…

You have one page to tell me what you’ve done with your life. Go.

A lot of people view the law school résumé as superfluous. While it doesn’t carry the weight of other elements, it does represent a whole lot more. You’ll be showing the law school what type of student you are, what you spent your time doing, and what accomplishments you can list. It sets the tone of your life, and if it doesn’t create a good impression, admissions officers will be going through your law school application with a sour taste in their mouths.

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Your Law School Application Checklist in 19 Simple (?) Steps

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

This law school application checklist is straight out of my new version of The Law School Admission Game, to be released in just a few weeks. References to chapters (below) are within the new book. I hope it’s helpful to those of you applying this fall for the Fall 2014 cycle (and beyond).

1. Register for CAS (Credential Assembly Service)
How?

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What to Write About in Your Law School Personal Statement

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

Your law school personal statement is your chance to be more than just your numbers, more than your transcripts. This is the substitute for meeting you face-to-face, this is your opportunity to share your best self, best experiences, and best stories. It’s your chance to be impressive. Feeling the pressure? You’re not alone. The most open ended part of your law school application presents the most questions:

What do law schools want to know? What are they looking for?

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Logical Reasonings / 11.20.12

A) The son of one of New York’s top lawyers is suing LSAC over accommodated LSAT testing. Wonder who his lawyer is. New York Post.

B) The law schools, they are a-changin’. ABA Journal.

C) Working on your law school personal statement and looking for a cure for writer’s block? Write a list of stuff! Law School Podcaster.

D) The Mars rover found something “earthshaking” in the planet’s soil. But NASA can’t tell us yet. NPR.

E) If you’re ever defending a murder suspect in court, beware. He may pour water on your head. Huffington Post.

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How to Nail that Law School Videoconference Interview

Back when I was applying to law schools, Harvard started an on-the-phone interview program. Getting the call wasn’t an auto-admit, but the presumption seemed to be that you were going to get in. Being a student at BC, my friends found it hilarious to call me from 617 numbers and pretend to be Toby Stock, the admissions dean who was making those calls.

Believe me, I know how nerve-wracking that interview can be. Luckily, I didn’t say, “Nice try!” and hang up when Toby actually gave me a call.

Since it ran the interview process as a pilot program six years ago, Harvard Law School has continued to find its class in part by talking with the candidates over the phone. Recently, HLS announced it is expanding the program to include videoconferencing.

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Write a Law School Personal Statement You Can Be Proud Of

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

With the October LSAT soon to be a thing of the past, it’s almost time (and time if you took the June LSAT) to get your law school personal statement in tip-top shape. Here are some of my best tips for crafting a personal statement you can really be proud of.

I know you’re sitting down right now, trying to write the most brilliant, persuasive, powerful law school personal statement ever written, but your fingers are paralyzed on the keys.

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Top Grammatical Errors on Law School Personal Statements

Ah, grammar.

You’ve brought down the mightiest of empires, possibly.

While that’s probably not true, grammatical errors in your law school personal statement certainly cast you in a negative light. It’s important to avoid them at all costs, but most people don’t have a firm enough grasp of grammar to properly edit their own essays.

That’s where we come in.

Here are the most common errors (by far) that I see in personal statements every year:

Most Common Law School Personal Statement Grammatical Error I: Watch out for your homonyms

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Book Review: The Art of the Law School Personal Statement

We’ve written dozens of blog posts about law school personal statements here on our helpful little LSAT blog, and I know you’ve read every one of them. But believe it or not, there are other resources out there that can help you craft the perfect law school admissions essay.

One of them is a new e-book called The Art of the Law School Personal Statement, by Michelle Fabio. Fabio is the former About.com Guide to Law School who became a Personal Statement Artist. Her latest work checks in at 89 pages, but manages to cover all the bases of writing an effective law school personal statement.

The book’s first point is that students should never underestimate the importance of the law school personal statement. Reading a book about how to write a 2-page essay is a good start in taking it seriously.