Tag Archive: law student

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3 Common Law School Myths Debunked

Anyone who has considered going to law school has almost certainly heard any number of awful things about the law school experience. I’ve got news for you: most of what you’ve heard is false. Need further proof? Check out the list of law school myths below:

Law School Myth I: You will have angry, pedantic professors who cleave to the Socratic method

I suspect this myth is born mostly of ages-old horror stories and people who have seen The Paper Chase one too many times. People imagine an old, white professor leering at a room full of law students, continuously peppering them with questions until he finds one they can’t answer. While you may run into a professor who believes strongly in the Socratic method, your law professors want to help you understand law. They don’t want it to appear mysterious and difficult.

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Logical Reasonings / 9.17.13

A) The ABA says law students can work as unpaid interns at law firms. Before you read ahead, can you get me a coffee? ABA Journal.

B) Listen up. Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has some things to say about law. Public Radio International.

C) Happy 100th birthday to the University of Utah law school. Deseret News.

D) The gunman in yesterday’s deadly mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard had a long history with the law. New York Times.

E) The reviews of Grand Theft Auto V are in. Running over homeless people with a firetruck has never been more realistic. The Onion.

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Logical Reasonings / 9.6.13

A) It’s law school application season. Which also means it’s also LSAC lawsuit season. St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

B) Speaking of lawsuits, here’s a student who’s suing his law school because he had to retake a class. Above the Law.

C) Aaron Hernandez pleads not guilty. But you probably shouldn’t pick him up in your fantasy league. CNN.

D) A volcano the size of New Mexico was discovered under the ocean. Have a good weekend! The Verge.

E) Screw “Blurred Lines.” The song of the summer is “The Fox.” Gawker.

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Obama’s 2-Year Law School Proposal May Not Be Necessary

Lately, much has been made about the high cost of legal education. Many law school graduates are being greeted with a difficult job market and a mountain of student loan debt. One proposed solution to the issue of cost has been the elimination of a year of law school. The rationale is twofold. Firstly, most law students would likely tell you that they did as little as possible during their 3L years. Secondly, by lopping off a third of law school, you would also lop off a year’s worth of tuition.

Well now President Obama has gotten in on the action, suggesting that law schools look into the elimination of the 3L year. The reactions have been mixed. As far as the potential efficacy of this approach to cost reduction, I can speak only to my own experience as a law student.

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LL.M. Degrees: More Job Prospects, or Just More Letters?

Ah, the LL.M. degree. If you’ve ever gone to law school, you’ve cracked many a joke about the international students and their LL.M.’s. The Master of Laws degree is almost synonymous with a foreign student trying to get a degree that will give them a beachhead in the U.S.

And law schools are increasingly using it to entice more money out of already-indebted law students.

The American Prospect has a recent article about the growth of these programs, especially in the wake of a number of law schools being forced to cut faculty and salaries in order to maintain their bottom line. Law school applications continue to drop precipitously, and that makes it harder to attract qualified candidates. Schools need to leverage scholarships to keep their numbers up, eating into their profits.

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Déjà Vu All Over Again: Law School Applications Down 13%

It’s to the point now where sounding like a broken record is giving me déjà vu.

Yet again, law school applications are down. Over 13% this time. Yet again, we here at Blueprint LSAT Preparation are repeating the news. Yet again, I sit to write an LSAT blog article on the impact of these decreases.

By now, everyone reading this LSAT blog should be aware of the general trend; of the issues in the legal profession stemming from the education system; of the employment issues for grads. If not, please take the time to check out some of my old articles on law school debt.

So what does the continuing decline in law school application numbers mean for you, the prospective law student?

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Should the Socratic Method Stay in Law School? Discuss

The Harvard Crimson, amongst others, has recently sought to once again cast doubt upon the utility of the Socratic method in law school. Among the reasons for this doubt is the fact that the Socratic method seems to decrease female participation in class. While this may be the case, I agreed with Above the Law that the Socratic Method can be intimidating across the board and that focusing on gender seems misguided at best.

Cold-calling and putting students on the spot with difficult follow-up questions is not a wholly ineffective means of legal training. For those who plan to pursue trial or appellate work, thinking on one’s feet in the face of authority can be a valuable skill. If it is a professor’s aim to hone this skill in class, then by all means continue on with the Socratic method.

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Logical Reasonings / 5.17.13

A) Interesting: A new study shows that the use of Socratic method in law school may cause female underachievement. Above the Law.

B) A Wake Forest student is not happy with his law school, but the law school ain’t backin’ down. JD Journal.

C) Thanks to law school students, couples in Sacramento can get divorced in mere seconds. Wall Street Journal.

D) And case of the Pop-Tart gun continues… Huffington Post.

E) Facebook is so popular, even our grandmas use it. And for that, we thank you, Mark Zuckerberg. BuzzFeed.

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Answering Your Mom’s Top 3 Questions About Law School

With the recent passage of this year’s Mother’s Day, we got to thinking, what would a mom want to ask her soon-to-be law student? As someone who was once a law a student, and as someone who has a mom, I feel at least 95% qualified to answer that question. And thusly (who doesn’t love an unnecessary suffix?) I bring you a list of things your mom may or may not ask you as you head off to law school.

Mom’s Law School Question I: What are you going to practice?

You can try to placate relatives with assurances that you’ll have it figured out by the time you graduate, but mothers generally require answer of greater depth. Just pray she knows just as little as you do about what you’re actually going to do with your law degree and tell her that you’re probably going to end up doing some “transactional” work.

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What to Write About in Your Law School Personal Statement

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

Your law school personal statement is your chance to be more than just your numbers, more than your transcripts. This is the substitute for meeting you face-to-face, this is your opportunity to share your best self, best experiences, and best stories. It’s your chance to be impressive. Feeling the pressure? You’re not alone. The most open ended part of your law school application presents the most questions:

What do law schools want to know? What are they looking for?